Afleveringen

  • The residents of Britain during the Iron Age are often collectively called 'Celts'. However, both before and during the Roman occupation, this term is a huge generalisation. In this episode we explore the real characteristics and variations of the lifestyle and communities of present day Wales in the 1st millennium BC.


    The people of Southern Britain were written about in part by both Ptolemy, who gives us the geographical location of different groups, and Tacitus who gives a slightly more colourful account of the people the Romans encountered. But with ongoing excavations and discoveries registered with the Portable Antiquities Scheme, more and more of the realities of their lives are revealed. Tristan speaks to Dr Oliver Davis from Cardiff University to find out more about what this evidence tells us about the people of Iron Age Wales. In particular, they discuss Caerau hill-fort, which once was home to between one and two hundred people, and is an incredible example of hill-forts from this area and period.


    To find out more about Caerau, please find it here: https://www.caerheritage.org/iron-age


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  • The Iliad and the Odyssey are two of the world’s most famous poems. But who was their author, Homer, and how have his name and poems survived so long, preserved for almost 3 millennia?


    In this episode of The Ancients, Tristan is joined once again by author, classicist, and cultural critic, Daisy Dunn. Daisy helps us dissect the complex works, legacy and influence of Homer. From the Trojan War to Ionic and Aeolic Greeks, we find out more about the inspiration and impact that Homer holds.


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  • What do we know about the earliest hominins to exist? With a story spanning one million years and counting, we're discovering more about how we came to be every day.


    In this episode of The Ancients, we're on location in the Natural History Museum in London as Tristan covers a huge topic; the history of human evolution! Today's guest, Professor Chris Stringer, joins us as we delve into the origins of modern humans. As a leading expert in the creation of our species, Chris takes us through his research on the origins of Homo Sapiens. From Neanderthals, fossil evidence, and Mitochondrial Eve, to his findings on our genetic relationship with Africa.


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  • The treatment of mental health has been rapidly growing and improving over the past few decades, but it actually goes back thousands of years.


    Whether it was the Ancient Greek physician Galen’s humoral theory - in which people’s mental health was determined by imbalances in the levels of four different substances in the body - or Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius’ meditations for guidance and self-improvement, ideas of mental health and its treatment have ranged from the intriguing to the totally bizarre, but many of them still have uses to this day.


    Tristan is joined once again by Dr Nick Summerton practicing doctor and author of ‘Greco-Roman Medicine and What it Can Teach Us Today’, published by Pen & Sword.


    The OSPP Four Temperaments Test


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  • According to Greek myth, Pandora was the first human woman - moulded from the earth by Hephaestus on the instruction of Zeus himself.


    We've all heard of Pandora's box, but in actual fact it was no such thing. Instead it was a jar containing all the evils of humanity, but even these contents of the jar are up for debate! So what is real story behind this often misunderstood, misinterpreted and maligned figure?


    In this episode Tristan is joined by esteemed author, broadcaster, classicist and comedian Natalie Haynes to discover the truth about the first woman of Ancient Greek mythology.


    Natalie's book Pandora's Jar: Women in the Greek Myths is available on Amazon here.


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  • Described as the "most important piece of prehistoric art to be found in Britain in the last 100 years", an elaborately decorated 5000 year-old chalk cylinder, discovered buried with 3 child skeletons in Yorkshire and as old as the first phase of Stonehenge, is going on display at the British Museum for the first time ever.


    To find out what the drum is, how it was found and what it tells us about Britain at the time Stonehenge was constructed, Tristan got special access to the World of Stonehenge exhibition. He spoke to Project Archaeologist Alice Beasley and Project Curator Dr Jennifer Wexler, who make up part of the team responsible for the drum's discovery, investigation and display.


    Find the full programme here: https://access.historyhit.com/ancient-and-classical/videos/the-world-of-stonehenge-revealed


    Why This 'Chalk Drum' Is The Prehistoric Find Of The Century YouTube video.


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  • The rise of Christianity in the first few centuries AD is one of the most significant stories in world history. But it’s also an incredibly turbulent one. It’s a story filled with (in)famous episodes of conflict with the Roman state. It’s a story of co-existence, but also one of intolerance and of violence.


    From martyrdom to monasticism; from Celsus to Hypatia; from the Emperor Constantine hedging his divine bets to early Christians burning down one of the greatest architectural wonders of the ancient Mediterranean World. In today’s episode Tristan chats to author and journalist Catherine Nixey about the rise of Christianity and the sometimes-violent interactions that early Christians had with the Classical World.


    This episode contains mentions of religious violence.


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  • Poetry, parables, and produce - how did someone live a healthy life in the ancient Greco-Roman world? Tristan is joined by author Mark Usher to talk about what we can learn from our ancient ancestors. Discussing the impact farming has on both physical and mental well-being, the role it played in music and song, and philosophical musings about the land - Tristan and Mark discuss how can we live a sustainable, and ancient inspired, way of life?


    Copies of Mark's book How To Be A Farmer: An Ancient Guide to Life on the Land can be found here.


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  • The 23rd of April marks Saint George's Day - but who are we actually celebrating? Is there any truth behind the myth of the man who slew the dragon and rescued the princess - and where does the Patron Saint of England actually come from? Spoiler alert - it's not where you think.


    In this episode Tristan travelled to the Lancashire Archives to talk to Dr Sam Riches, from Lancaster University, about all things Saint George. Religious origins, centuries old cults, and farm animals going on a day out to the local church - there's more to Saint George than the well known myth.


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  • When we think of the modern Mediterranean, delicious and vibrant food is one of the first things that come to mind. But how much has the regional food changed over the last two millennia? In this episode Tristan is joined by host of 'The Delicious Legacy' Thomas Ntinas to discuss just how much the food has changed and helps by providing Tristan with some mouth-watering home made recreations of just what they would have eaten. The importance of fresh produce, who would've eaten an extravagant meal just like the one Tristan is served, and the importance of honey and wine, Thom takes us on a flavoursome journey through history.


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  • Who was Mary Magdalene? Jesus' confidant, a devout follower, or a sex worker?


    In this Easter special, Tristan is joined by Professors Helen Bond and Joan Taylor, authors of 'Women Remembered' to explore Mary Magdalene and her role in the bible. Through looking at both ancient and contemporary source material, depictions in art across the centuries, and exploring religious themes they hope to offer a new narrative on the vital roles women played in the Bible.


    Their book 'Women Remembered' is out now.


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  • When someone says the Terracotta Army, you’d be forgiven for instantly thinking of rows upon rows of life size warriors, arranged in three pits as part of the Emperor Qin Shi Huang’s huge mausoleum complex. But what’s arguably an even more fascinating aspect of these Warriors are the wide range of bronze weapons that they are buried with. From swords to spears to hooks to crossbow triggers, hundreds of these weapons survive in extraordinary condition.


    What can we learn from these weapons about the whole making of the Terracotta Army? Where were they made? Who oversaw their production? What do they reveal about the all-important logistics behind the creation of the Terracotta Army? To explain all, UCL honorary research fellow Dr Xiuzhen Li returned to the podcast.

    Listen to Xiuzhen’s previous episode, The Terracotta Army.


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  • Gaius Marius (157 BC – 86 BC) was one of the first warlords of the late Roman Republic, a general and statesman who held the office of consul an unprecedented seven times during his life.


    In this episode Tristan is joined by Dr Federico Santangelo, Professor of Ancient History at the University of Newcastle, to find out more about the man whose career changed the course of Rome's future.


    Federico's book Marius is available here.


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  • Roman connections with Britain stretch back to (at least) the mid 1st century BC. But what has archaeology revealed about the Late Iron Age British societies they interacted with? Do we have any concrete evidence for the druids? Was human sacrifice a thing? Sit back and enjoy in this very special Ancients episode, as experts provide a detailed run down of life and death in Late Iron Age Britain. The episode covers several topics: urbanisation, ritual and religion, trade, slavery and warfare. Featuring Durham University's Professor Tom Moore, alongside Colchester and Ipswich Museums' Dr Frank Hargrave and Dr Carolina Lima.


    The Lexden Tumulus History Hit YouTube video


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  • In Ancient Greece, the symposium was no ordinary after-dinner drinking party, but one in which the Hellenic men of society got together to wine, recline and philosophise. They took various forms depending on the whim of the leader of the symposium - the symposiarch - but were exclusively male affairs (aside from the occasional courtesan or two).


    In this episode Tristan is joined by Michael Scott, Professor of Classics and Ancient History at the University of Warwick, to find out more about the soirée of booze, babes and slaves that was the Ancient Greek symposium.


    We mention a few different vessel types. Here are some visuals of the different vessels we mention:


    The kylix / kylikes

    The krater

    The oinochoe

    The psykter

    The plate


    You might also like: How to Party Like a Roman


    Warning: a couple of cases of mild language.


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  • Man's best friend has been at our side for thousands of years. Ancient Greece was no exception, and although some of the types of dog that were popular back then might seem unfamiliar to us today, tales of their loyalty, dependability and downright cuteness certainly are not.


    From dog names, to their function in Greek religion, to their usefulness–including their possible deployment on the battlefield–what do we know about dogs in Ancient Greece? In this episode Tristan is joined by Dr Owen Rees of Manchester Metropolitan University to find out just that.


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  • The legacies of the Ides of March stretch from that very afternoon on March 14th 44BC to the modern day. From Roman times to the Medieval period, from Dante to Shakespeare, and from Brutus to the other infamous assassin he inspired in John Wilkes Booth, the echoes of Julius Caesar's assassination have continued to reverberate through time over the last two thousand years.


    In this episode, the last of our special four-part miniseries on the Ides of March, Tristan sits down with Professor Maria Wyke of University College London to find out more about the political, social and cultural legacies of the fateful day that led to the birth of the Roman Empire and so much more.


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  • Dinosaurs! Spectacular resilient beings who were able to adapt and survive the most terrifying of events. Evolving from a group of mostly humble-sized creatures, into the most enormous beasts that ever existed on land. But how did the first true dinosaurs emerge? In this episode, Tristan is joined by Professor Stephen L. Brusatte. Stephen is a Palaeontologist and evolutionary biologist who specialises in the anatomy and evolution of dinosaurs. He takes us through not just the evolution of dinosaurs, but the development of the new world and ecosystems that allowed them to thrive. What can we learn from the magnificent creatures who ruled the earth before us?


    Stephen L. Brusatte is the author of 'The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World', published by Picador.


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  • What happened after the Ides of March? How did the Romans go from co-ordinated assassinations to the Pax Romana? From Tyranny to prosperity? In this third episode of our Ides of March series, Tristan is joined by Dr Hannah Cornwell to discuss the turbulent relations that erupted between Marc Antony and Octavian (Young Caesar), following Julius Caesar's assassination. Secluded meetings, arranged marriages, reconciliations, dissensions, and a love affair for the ages - what really happened between the Young Caesar and Marc Antony?


    If you'd like to learn more about this really interesting period, you might like to listen to one of our following episodes:


    Death of the Roman Republic: The Battles of Philippi, with Steele Brand - Octavian and Marc Antony vs Marcus Brutus and Cassius

    Cicero's Fight for the Roman Republic, with Steele Brand - Octavian vs Marc Antony in northern Italy at Mutina

    Agrippa: Rome's Forgotten Hero, with Lindsay Powell - Agrippa and Octavian in the 30s BC.

    The Birth of the Roman Empire, with Dr Hannah Cornwell - Augustus and peace at the dawn of the Imperial Period post Marc Antony.

    Augustus and Agrippa: The Golden Age, with Lindsay Powell - What followed Marc Antony's defeat at Actium.


    As for Actium itself, and the demise of Marc Antony and Cleopatra, we aim to cover all in detail in a future podcast episode.


    A quick note from Hannah, Caligula was assassinated in 41 AD / CE.


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  • Man, myth or legend... who was the real Saint Patrick? Did he really banish all the snakes from Ireland? Where does the shamrock tradition come from? And was he even Irish?


    In this episode, Tristan is joined by Professor Lisa Bitel of USC Dornsife to find out more about the true identity of the mysterious figure who became Patron Saint of Ireland and gave his hallowed name to St Paddy's Day.


    Order Tristan's book, Alexander's Successors at War, today 📖➡️ https://ed.gr/dylvo


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