Afleveringen

  • Tsedal Neeley: Remote Work Revolution
    Tsedal Neeley is a professor at the Harvard Business School. Her work focuses on how leaders can scale their organizations by developing and implementing global and digital strategies. She has published extensively in leading scholarly and practitioner-oriented outlets and her work has been widely covered in media outlets such as the BBC, CNN, Financial Times, NPR, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

    She was named to the Thinkers50 On the Radar list for making lasting contributions to management and is the recipient of many other awards and honors for her teaching and research. She is the author of Remote Work Revolution: Succeeding from Anywhere*.

    In this conversation, Tsedal and I explore what the research shows us about productivity and fear around remote work. We highlight three key principles that leaders can lean in on in order to engage remote teams better. Plus, Tsedal provides practical examples on how almost any leader can put these principles into action.
    Key Points

    The research has been clear for decades that employees are more productive working remotely.
    Surveillance software and services are almost always a poor direction for leaders and organizations.
    Leaders should structure unstructured time for informal interactions — and should be the ones who initiate these conversations.
    Emphasize individuals and individual differences, even more so than you might in person. Avoid referring to people by their membership in subgroups.
    In addition to not shutting down conflict, leaders in remote settings need to force it, so the best ideas can emerge on the team.

    Resources Mentioned

    Remote Work Revolution: Succeeding from Anywhere* by Tsedal Neeley
    Tsedal Neeley’s website

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404)
    Transitioning to Remote Leadership, with Tammy Bjelland (episode 509)
    The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529)

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  • Jonathan Raymond: Good Authority
    Jonathan Raymond is the founder of Refound, where he and his team work with organizations to create a company culture based in personal growth. He’s the author of the book Good Authority: How to Become the Leader Your Team Is Waiting For*. He's also the creator of the Accountability Dial and the courses Good Accountability and Good Alignment.

    In this conversation, Jonathan and I discuss the importance of starting with the purpose for a role when considering how to approach one-on-ones. We frame the importance of elevation and linking professional activities with personal growth. Plus, we invite leaders to begin with a few, practical steps.
    Key Points

    Begin with the purpose of the role. Clarity on expectations and personal growth will both come from there.
    Utilize curiosity to begin to align on expectations and what’s next.
    Elevation is a key competency for managers in one-on-ones. Help employees link what the role needs and how their personal growth aligns to it.
    Be willing to stay flexible on how often and how long you meet for. There are times when more interaction may be wise, but one-on-ones should not take over your professional life as a manager.
    Few managers do this well. Even small movement to get better at supporting your employees can provide big returns in retention.

    Resources Mentioned

    Good Alignment course*
    Good Accountability course*
    Good Authority: How to Become the Leader Your Team Is Waiting For by Jonathan Raymond

    Related Episodes

    How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464)
    How to Define a Role, with Pat Griffin (episode 517)
    How to Help People Thrive, with Jim Harter (episode 532)

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  • Sandra Sucher: The Power of Trust
    Sandra Sucher is an internationally recognized trust researcher and professor of management practice at Harvard Business School. She studies how organizations build trust and the vital role leaders play in the process. Before joining Harvard, she was a business executive for 20 years, served on corporate and nonprofit boards, and has been Chair of the Better Business Bureau.

    As an advisor to the Edelman Trust Barometer, her research has been featured in several national publications. She is the author with Shalene Gupta of the book, The Power of Trust: How Companies Build It, Lose It, Regain It*.

    In this conversation, Sandra and I explore the three elements of a good apology in the professional setting. We also look at additional elements the research suggests may be useful in many places in our lives. Finally, Sandra highlights some ways we can do better on empathy in order to avoid situations where we destroy trust.
    Key Points
    Combine three elements for a good apology, especially in a professional setting:

    Acknowledgment of responsibility: The offender makes a statement that demonstrates they understand their part in the trust betrayal.
    Explanation: The offender describes the reasons for the problem.
    Offer of repair: The offender offers a solution for rebuilding trust.

    In addition, consider three more elements for apologies in any scenario:

    Expression of regret: The offender expresses how sorry they are.
    Declaration of repentance: The offender promises not to make the same mistake again.
    Request for forgiveness: The offender explicitly asks for pardon.

    To interrupt the reality that leaders tend to struggle with empathy:

    Reflect in writing with as much detail as possible about the people and situation in question.
    Ask yourself, “Am I being fair?”

    Resources Mentioned

    The Power of Trust: How Companies Build It, Lose It, Regain It* by Sandra Sucher and Shalene Gupta
    The Power of Trust website

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254)
    The Choice for Compassion, with Edith Eger (episode 336)
    The Way Into Difficult Conversations, with Kwame Christian (episode 497)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*.
    Listener Questions

    Mark asked our advice on how to navigate a sensitive situation with an unsupportive colleague.
    Geraldine wondered about how to implement management accountability with public sector employees.
    Samuel asked about building personal capacity.
    James asked if we were aware of resources for a leadership body of knowledge.

    Resources Mentioned

    7 Habits of Highly Effective People* by Stephen Covey
    Getting Things Done* by David Allen
    Center for Creative Leadership
    Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership
    How to Win Friends and Influence People* by Dale Carnegie
    The Leadership Challenge: How to Make Extraordinary Things Happen in Organizations* by James Kouzes and Barry Posner
    Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)

    Related Episodes

    Eight Ways To Use Power For Good (episode 154)
    How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464)
    How to Say No Without Saying No, with Lois Frankel (episode 471)
    How to Create Your Personal Vision (free membership required)

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  • Katy Milkman: How to Change
    Katy Milkman is an award-winning behavioral scientist and professor at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. She hosts Charles Schwab’s popular behavioral economics podcast Choiceology, and is the co-founder and co-director of The Behavior Change for Good Initiative.

    Katy has worked with or advised dozens of organizations on how to spur positive change and her research is regularly featured in major media outlets such as The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and NPR. She is the author of the book, How to Change: The Science of Getting from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be*.

    In this conversation, Katy and I explore the research on confidence. We highlight some of the key tactics we can use to enhance our own feelings of confidence. Plus, we explore some of the ways that leaders may be able to support confidence-building in others.
    Key Points

    Self doubt affects our ability to take action.
    Our expectations shape reality. How we think about something affects how it is.
    Leaders can support those with less confidence by inviting them to be a mentor or coach for others.
    Set ambitious goals, but allow yourself a limited number of emergency passes when you slip up.
    Focus on personal experiences that make you feel successful or proud.

    Resources Mentioned

    How to Change: The Science of Getting from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be* by Katy Milkman

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Way to Make New Behaviors Stick, with Marshall Goldsmith (episode 196)
    The Way to Be More Coach-Like, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 458)
    How to Change Your Behavior, with BJ Fogg (episode 507)

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  • Jim Harter: Wellbeing at Work
    Jim Harter is Chief Scientist for Gallup’s workplace management and wellbeing practices. He has led more than 1,000 studies of workplace effectiveness and is the bestselling coauthor of It’s the Manager, 12: The Elements of Great Managing, and Wellbeing: The Five Essential Elements. Jim has also published articles in many prominent business and academic journals and he's the author with Jim Clifton of Wellbeing at Work: How to Build Resilient and Thriving Teams*.

    In this conversation, Jim and I discuss Gallup’s recent research findings on what managers and organizations can do to support wellbeing at work. We highlight the five key elements of wellbeing from the research and the obstacles that managers and organizations face in supporting these. Plus, we share practical steps that each of us can take to support wellbeing among the people in our organizations.
    Key Points

    People report that their strongest links to net thriving are “my job” and “my manager.”
    The five key elements of wellbeing are, in this order: Career, Social, Financial, Physical, and Community.
    Many people report that “time with a manager” is the worst part of the day.
    To support better wellbeing, make it a part of regular career conversations.
    Have open conversations about pay philosophies. Data shows this is even more important than the actual salary.
    Giving meaningful feedback every week is a basic requirement of management.
    Gallup’s data shows that only half of employees worldwide know what is expected of that at work, a significant contributor to stress and anxiety.

    Resources Mentioned

    Wellbeing at Work: How to Build Resilient and Thriving Teams* by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237)
    How to Manage Abrasive Leaders, with Sharone Bar-David (episode 290)
    How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293)
    Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370)
    Gallup Findings on the Changing Nature of Work, with Jim Harter (episode 409)

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  • Manu Mazzanti
    Manu Mazzanti is an energy giver who brings focus and resilience to bold and daring transformative journeys. As a regional talent development leader for a global consulting firm, Manu is committed to enabling talent potential through coaching, facilitation, and leadership development. He is out there to make an impact as a father, conscious leader, and marathon runner. Manu is also an alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy.
    Key Points

    Ken Coleman’s analogy of climbing the mountain (and realizing you might be on the wrong one) was helpful to identify what was next.
    Keith Ferrazzi says that leadership starts with us. In addition, we all have the opportunity to do a lot of leading without authority.
    James Clear’s work was helpful to make habit changes easily instead of trying to make major changes, at all at once.
    The Academy helped provide a framework for the 2-3 year vision and take daily actions to bring it into reality.

    Resources Mentioned

    Manu Mazzanti on LinkedIn
    Coaching for Leaders Academy
    Shine: Ignite Your Inner Game to Lead Consciously at Work and in the World* by Carley Hauck
    Create a World That Works: Tools for Personal and Global Transformation* by Alan Seale and Cheryl Dorsey

    Related Episodes

    How to Find Your Calling, with Ken Coleman (episode 352)
    How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376)
    Leadership Means You Go First, with Keith Ferrazzi (episode 488)
    The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518)
    Making the Case for Your Promotion, with May Busch (episode 526)

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  • Amy Gallo: HBR Guide to Dealing with Conflict
    Amy Gallo is an expert in conflict, communication, and workplace dynamics. She combines the latest management research with practical advice to deliver evidence-based ideas on how to improve relationships and excel at work. She is the author of the Harvard Business Review Guide to Dealing with Conflict*, a how-to guidebook about handling conflict professionally and productively.

    In her role as a contributing editor at Harvard Business Review, Amy writes frequently about a range of topics with a focus on interpersonal dynamics, communicating ideas, leading and influencing people, and building your career. She is also co-host of Harvard Business Review’s Women at Work podcast, which is in its sixth season.

    In this conversation, Amy and I discuss some of the key strategies that have emerged from her research on the most effective ways to prepare for conflict. We explore why a larger strategy is more important than a script, how to plan out your message, and the value of taking the other side’s perspective.
    Key Points

    Be honest with yourself that a conversation may be difficult, but also seek a constructive way to frame it.
    Take your counterpart’s perspective, but don’t assume you know everything they are thinking.
    Plan your message by appealing to a shared goal.
    Focus your efforts on framing the larger strategy and outcome rather than a specific script or phrases.
    Avoid scripting out a conversation, but have clarity on how you will start and the 2-3 points you need to convey.
    When conflict emerges in the organization, leaders are wise to lean into it rather than shutting it down in the moment.

    Resources Mentioned

    Harvard Business Review Guide to Dealing with Conflict* by Amy Gallo
    Harvard Business Review’s Women at Work podcast
    Amy Gallo’s website

    Related Episodes

    How to Manage Abrasive Leaders, with Sharone Bar-David (episode 290)
    The Way Into Difficult Conversations, with Kwame Christian (episode 497)
    The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529)

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  • Amanda Ripley: High Conflict
    Amanda Ripley is an investigative journalist and a New York Times bestselling author. She’s spent her career trying to make sense of complicated human mysteries, from what happens to our brains in a disaster to how some countries manage to educate virtually all their kids to think for themselves.

    Her first book, The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes—and Why*, was published in 15 countries and turned into a PBS documentary. Her next book, The Smartest Kids in the World—and How They Got That Way*, was a New York Times bestseller. Her most recent book is High Conflict: Why We Get Trapped and How We Get Out*.

    In this conversation, Amanda and I discuss the distinction between good, healthy conflict — and high conflict that becomes unproductive for almost everybody. We discuss how humiliation is often such a strong catalyst for high conflict. Finally, we explore many of the practical steps to take in order to avoid the worst conflicts and do better for ourselves and our organizations.
    Key Points

    Good conflict often brings surprises, but high conflict is surprisingly predictable.
    Humiliation is one of the most powerful fire starters in triggering high conflict.
    Limit humiliation by avoiding attacks on someone’s identity, especially in a public forum.
    Distancing yourself from “conflict entrepreneurs” can help provide the space to emerge from high conflict.
    Resist binaries and us vs. them language. When people get sorted into two groups, that can lay a foundation for high conflict.
    Slowing down conflict can often provide the opportunity to emerge with productive dialogue.

    Resources Mentioned

    High Conflict: Why We Get Trapped and How We Get Out* by Amanda Ripley

    Related Episodes

    How to Listen When Someone Is Venting, with Mark Goulston (episode 91)
    How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328)
    How to Find Confidence in Conflict, with Kwame Christian (episode 380)

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  • Erica Dhawan: Digital Body Language
    Erica Dhawan is a globally recognized leadership expert and keynote speaker helping organizations and leaders innovate faster and further, together. Named as one of the top management professionals around the world by Global Gurus, she is the founder and CEO of Cotential, a company that has helped leaders and teams leverage twenty-first-century collaboration skills.

    Erica’s writing has appeared in dozens of publications, including Fast Company and Harvard Business Review. She is the co-author of Get Big Things Done* and the author of the new book, Digital Body Language: How to Build Trust and Connection, No Matter the Distance*.

    In this conversation, Erica and I highlight common missteps that cause leaders to generate unnecessary anxiety from their communication. We discuss how brevity, response time, passive aggressiveness, and formality can work against us — and what we can adjust on our own behaviors to do better.
    Key Points

    In a way, all of us are now immigrants, processing more interactions in a digital world that is less familiar.
    Excessive brevity may save a few keystrokes or seconds in the moment, but can generate lots of extra work for the team and organization.
    Reduce anxiety by being explicit about our expectations on response time and teaching others what to expect from us.
    Changing tone and formality without explanation can be jarring.
    Seemingly unimportant choices like who we list first on emails can generate assumptions from those we’re communicating to.

    Resources Mentioned

    Digital Body Language: How to Build Trust and Connection, No Matter the Distance* by Erica Dhawan
    The Digital Body Language Expert Course

    Related Episodes

    How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464)
    How to Run an Online Meeting, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 472)
    How to Be Present, with Dave Crenshaw (episode 511)

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  • Glenn Parker: Positive Influence
    Glenn Parker is a team building and organizational consultant to many of the world's leading corporations, including Novartis, Merck, Lucent, and Accenture. He is the author of 15 books, including the bestsellers, Team Players and Teamwork: New Strategies for Developing Successful Collaboration* and Cross-Functional Teams: Working with Allies, Enemies, and Other Strangers*.

    Glenn's assessment survey, the Parker Team Player Survey, published by CPP, has sold more than one million copies. He is the author with his son Michael Parker of the book, Positive Influence: The Leader Who Helps People Become Their Best Self*.

    In this episode, Glenn and I discuss the importance of leaders recognizing the contributions of other leaders in our careers — and the ways we can become positive influences for others. We detail the four different ways to be a supportive leader and the first steps that each of us can take to do this more consistently.
    Key Points
    Four different ways to be a leader who has a positive influence on others:

    The Supportive Positive Influence Leader: the one who believes in you
    The Teacher Positive Influence Leader: the one who helps you develop the skills you need
    The Motivating Positive Influence Leader: the one who shows you why you need to do something and helps you believe that you can do it
    The Role Model Positive Influence Leader: the one who demonstrates through their actions how you can be successful

    Resources Mentioned

    Positive Influence: The Leader Who Helps People Become Their Best Self* by Glenn Parker and Michael Parker

    Related Episodes

    Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421)
    Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505)
    How to Be Present, with Dave Crenshaw (episode 511)

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  • May Busch: How to Get Promoted
    May Busch is the former Chief Operating Officer of Morgan Stanley Europe. She was promoted 10 times during her 24-year career at Morgan Stanley. Today, she's an executive coach and mentor, helping professionals overcome (often hidden) obstacles, advance to the next level in their careers, and reach their full potential.

    May is the author of Accelerate: 9 Capabilities to Achieve Success at Any Career Stage and the creator of the How to Get Promoted Course*.

    In this conversation, May and I discuss the key principles that professionals should consider when advocating for their next promotion. We explore a few of the mistakes that some people rely on — and how to do better through your track record, business case, and future thinking. Plus, May shares several tactics that will help you get visibility on what senior leaders are thinking.
    Key Points

    Being a culture carrier is a wonderful place to be in an organization, but it’s not enough for promotion.
    Threatening to leave can work in some cases, but it’s not laying the groundwork for long-term trust.
    Your track record should include your accomplishments, experiences, strengths, and skills. Others who are close to you can often help you be more objective on what these are.
    Ultimately a promotion is a business decision. Help more senior leaders make the business case for why you are the right decision.
    Perceived risks about you might be fair or not. Regardless, responding in a matter-of-face manner to concerns is more likely to help you alleviate them.

    Resources Mentioned

    Discover What It Really Takes to Get a Promotion*, a free training series by May Busch
    Accelerate: 9 Capabilities to Achieve Success at Any Career Stage by May Busch

    Related Episodes

    Move From Caretaker to Rainmaker, with May Busch (episode 390)
    How to Work With an Executive Recruiter, with Becky deSouza (episode 406)
    Craft a Career to Fit Your Strengths, with Scott Anthony Barlow (episode 424)

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  • Marissa King: Social Chemistry
    Marissa King is professor of Organizational Behavior at the Yale School of Management, where she developed and teaches a popular course entitled Managing Strategic Networks. Over the past fifteen years, she has studied how people's social networks evolve, what they look like, and why that's significant.

    Her most recent line of research analyzes the individual and group-level behaviors that are necessary for large-scale organizational change. She is the author of Social Chemistry: Decoding the Patterns of Human Connection*.

    In this conversation, Marissa and I explore the three major categories of personal networks — along with the strengths and challenges of each one. We make the invitation to strengthen your existing network instead of trying to further expand it. Plus, Marissa highlights several practical tips to more fully leverage the power of your own network.
    Key Points
    There are three types of networks:

    Expansionists have extraordinarily large networks and tend to be well known. They tend to be inspiring in both social and professional settings.
    Brokers generate value by bringing together from different social spaces. Their networks have large information benefits and are innovative. They are adaptive and have better work-life balance.
    Conveners build dense networks where all theirs friends are also friends. They enjoy deep trust and reputation benefits. Conveners tend to be great listeners.


    Maintaining great relationships with your existing network is often more productive than attempting to grow entirely new relationships.
    Those with very close relationships have been able to weather the storm of the pandemic with little impact on loneliness.
    We tend to underestimate both the strength of our networks and the willingness of others to help us.
    A starting point to improve the strength of your exiting network is either to be generous to someone by helping them in some way or to ask for support with something that might be helpful to us.

    Resources Mentioned

    Social Chemistry: Decoding the Patterns of Human Connection* by Marissa King
    Assess Your Network

    Related Episodes

    Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254)
    The Power of Weak Connections, with David Burkus (episode 347)
    Four Habits That Derail Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 500)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*.
    Listener Questions

    Linda asks advice on how to respond to burnout in her organization.
    Taylor wonders about the best time to create team expectations.
    Robert asks how to move forward when his manager doesn’t provide any meaningful feedback.

    Related Episodes

    The Way to Lead After a Workplace Loss, with Andrew Stenhouse (episode 142)
    How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192)
    How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249)
    The Path to Start Leading Your Team, with John Piñeiro (episode 349)
    How to Find Helpful Advisors, with Ethan Kross (episode 516)
    How to Define a Role, with Pat Griffin (episode 517)

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  • Greg McKeown: Effortless
    Greg McKeown is a speaker, bestselling author, and the host of the popular podcast What’s Essential. He has been covered by The New York Times, Fast Company, Fortune, Politico, and Inc. and has been interviewed on NPR, NBC, Fox, and many others.

    He is among the most popular bloggers for LinkedIn and also a Young Global Leader for the World Economic Forum. His New York Times bestselling book Essentialism* has sold more than a million copies worldwide. He's the author of the new book, Effortless: Make It Easier to Do What Matters Most*.

    In this conversation, Greg and I explore how to simplify by asking key questions of ourselves and others. We discuss the tendency many of us have to work hard, but not necessarily clearly define what we’re trying to achieve. Plus, Greg invites us to look at the minimum steps required to complete what’s most essential.
    Key Points

    Take one minute to stop and define what done looks like.
    Crafting a “done for the day” list can provide clarity and boundaries to help us zero in on what’s most important.
    Ask yourself: what are the minimum steps required for completion?
    There’s a key distinction between a minimum number of steps and “phoning it in.”
    Decide in advance on what kind of work requires A+ effort, and where B effort is sufficient — and perhaps even better.

    Resources Mentioned

    Effortless: Make It Easier to Do What Matters Most* by Greg McKeown
    Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less* by Greg McKeown
    What’s Essential podcast by Greg McKeown

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Way to Stop Spinning Your Wheels on Planning (episode 319)
    See What Really Matters, with Greg McKeown (episode 469)
    How to Change Your Behavior, with BJ Fogg (episode 507)

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  • Michael Hyatt: Win at Work and Succeed at Life
    Michael is the founder and chairman of Michael Hyatt & Company, which helps leaders get the focus they need to win at work and succeed at life. Formerly chairman and CEO of Thomas Nelson Publishers, Michael is also the creator of the Full Focus Planner*.

    Michael is the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today bestselling author of several books, including Free to Focus*, Your Best Year Ever*, Living Forward*, and Platform*. His work has been featured by the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Inc., Fast Company, Businessweek, Entrepreneur, and other publications. He is the author with his daughter Meghan Hyatt Miller of Win at Work and Succeed at Life: 5 Principles to Free Yourself from the Cult of Overwork*.

    In this conversation, Michael and I discuss the challenge that many leaders face in finding balance. While many of us are motivated by achievement, Michael invites us to consider the value of nonachievment. We explore where to start and the benefits of being a beginner again through hobbies and other activities, unrelated to our careers.
    Key Points

    There’s incredible power in nonachievement.
    Many high-achieving people tend to have two leisure modes: feeling weird, unsettled, and distracted when taking time off — or vegging out on screens after exhaustion.
    Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi advises doing something that’s not related to work at all to get you into a different mindset.
    Beware the belief that your hobby is your work. Spending more time on a hobby that has nothing to do with work can boost confidence in your ability to perform your job well.
    The challenge for high achievers in starting a hobby is that they must be a beginner again. Getting coaching to help get through these early stages can help.

    Resources Mentioned

    Bonus Resources: Win at Work and Succeed at Life
    Win at Work and Succeed at Life: 5 Principles to Free Yourself from the Cult of Overwork* by Michael Hyatt and Megan Hyatt Miller

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Transcend Work-Life Balance, with Scott Anthony Barlow (episode 315)
    How to Reclaim Conversation, with Cal Newport (episode 400)
    Finding Joy Through Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417)
    How to Sell Your Vision, with Michael Hyatt (episode 482)

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  • Raja Rajamannar: Quantum Marketing
    Raja Rajamannar is Chief Marketing & Communications Officer for Mastercard, and president of the company’s healthcare business. He also serves as president of the World Federation of Advertisers. Raja has held C-level roles at firms ranging from Anthem to Humana, and has overseen the successful evolution of Mastercard’s identity for the digital age, from its Priceless experiential platforms to marketing-led business models.

    Raja’s work has been featured in Harvard Business School and Yale School of management case studies, and been taught at more than 40 top management schools around the world. He is the author of Quantum Marketing: Mastering the New Marketing Mindset for Tomorrow's Consumers*.

    In this conversation, Raja and I discuss the reality that traditional advertising as we know it is ending. He also invites us to rethink how we’ve traditionally thought about customer loyalty. Instead of telling stories about our brands, we should be doing the work to create stories along with our customers.
    Key Points

    Organizations need to engage in permission-based marketing to be credible to consumers.
    It’s helpful to think about relationships with consumers as affinity instead of loyalty.
    Most of what we call advertising today is interruptive to consumers and a poor experience. It’s not entirely dead, but certainly heading that way.
    Invite consumers into unique experiences by making the transition from storytelling to story making.
    Create experiences that are scalable and economically viable and sustainable.
    Smaller firms can seek out opportunities to create partnership that will help them make stories that are purposeful.

    Resources Mentioned

    Quantum Marketing: Mastering the New Marketing Mindset for Tomorrow's Consumers* by Raja Rajamannar

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Lead Top-Line Growth, with Tim Sanders (episode 299)
    Serve Others Through Marketing, with Seth Godin (episode 381)
    Where to Start on Subscriptions, with Robbie Kellman Baxter (episode 484)
    If You Build It, They Will Come (Dave’s Journal)

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  • Shannon Minifie: Box of Crayons
    Shannon is the CEO of Box of Crayons, the firm behind the best-selling books The Coaching Habit* and The Advice Trap*. Box of Crayons is a learning and development company that helps unleash the power of curiosity to create connected and engaged company cultures.

    Shannon followed an unusual path to becoming CEO of Box of Crayons. Her career began in academia, a pursuit driven by her desire to be a part of conversations she thinks are important. In 2016, she embarked on a new path, starting a career in corporate learning and development. She brings to her role more than a decade of experience in education and in practicing incisive investigation.

    In this conversation, Shannon and I talk about the word curiosity and the reality that not everybody thinks about that word the same way we do. We explore the distinction between troublemakers and changemakers and provide practical suggestions to inspire more curiosity inside your organization. Plus, we highlight many of the common barriers to utilizing curiosity well.
    Key Points

    Curiosity is a state, not a trait.
    Nobody says they are against curiosity. But the truth is that they’re suspicious of it.
    Four things tend to hold firms back from the benefits of changemaker curiosity:


    Complacency: being used to the status quo.
    Delusion: the belief that they are already good at it.
    Environment: espoused values vs. what’s being done in practice because of real barriers.
    The Advice Monster: too much a cultural reliance on advice-giving.

    Resources Mentioned

    Box of Crayons
    The Coaching Habit: Say Less, Ask More & Change the Way You Lead Forever* by Michael Bungay Stanier
    The Advice Trap: Be Humble, Stay Curious & Change the Way You Lead Forever* by Michael Bungay Stanier

    Related Episodes

    How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404)
    The Way to Be More Coach-Like, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 458)
    How to Build a Coaching Culture, with Andrea Wanerstrand (episode 501)

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  • David Sparks: MacSparky
    David Sparks speaks and writes about how to use technology to be more productive. David is a past speaker at Macworld / iWorld and a regular faculty member for the American Bar Association’s TechShow.

    David has published numerous books and videos on how to use technology including the MacSparky Field Guide series that includes videos and books on managing email, going paperless, and how to make a winning presentation. David is also co-host of the popular Mac Power Users, Automators, and Focused podcasts. When not speaking and writing about technology, he’s a business attorney in Orange County, California.

    David recently released his Paperless Field Guide*. In this conversation, David and I review the key steps to managing a paperless lifestyle including how to capture, process, edit, and share documents. We share useful hacks to find data in documents, track changes, annotate PDFs, and much more.
    Key Points

    The goal of the paperless lifestyle is to provide sanity so you’re not spending time and energy managing paperwork.
    Scanner Pro is David’s recommended app for most people who want to capture documents easily with optical character recognition (OCR).
    Getting your documents into PDF format will allow them to be accessible for the future and also protect you from trouble with future software versions.
    Decide on a personal syntax for how you name files. Including a noun, verb, and date can be useful to surface documents later.
    Use “track changes” on Microsoft Word or “suggesting” on Google Docs for collaboration, review, and editing.
    If you use a tablet and do lots of reading or document review, consider utilizing some of the newest features for annotation and markup.

    Resources Mentioned

    Paperless Field Guide* by David Sparks
    LinkedIn Learning is a useful starting point for foundational skills on major software programs like Microsoft Word
    Mac Power Users podcast

    Related Episodes

    How To Get Control Of Your Email, with David Sparks (episode 119)
    The Way to Stop Spinning Your Wheels on Planning (episode 319)
    Align Your Calendar to What Matters, with Nir Eyal (episode 431)

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  • Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership
    Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. An internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership.

    In this episode Tom and I discuss the common challenge of both making sense to others and making sense of what others say to you. Tom invites us to follow a four step approach of sorting and labeling so that it’s easier for listening to follow our thinking. Finally, we explore some of the common missteps in communicating with more clarity.
    Key Points

    The why behind making sense: it’s better for both the sender and the receiver.
    There are four key parts to the structure of making sense to others:


    Create a headline
    Sort into folders
    Label each folder
    Transition with precision


    Tom shared an example of two different ways to communicate a message about presentation skills, one without sorting and labeling, and one with it.
    Common mistakes in making sense include the espoused number of items not matching the number of actual items, explaining the folders first before setting the stage, and not transitioning well.

    Resources Mentioned

    Sorting & Labeling by Tom Henschel (PDF download)
    Subscribe to Tom's updates

    Related Episodes

    Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech, with Tom Henschel (episode 316)
    The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450)
    Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505)

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