Afleveringen

  • Tammy Bjelland: Workplaceless
    Tammy Bjelland is the Founder and CEO of Workplaceless, a training company that teaches remote workers, leaders, and companies how to work, lead, grow, and thrive in distributed environments. Workplaceless is a fully distributed company supporting enterprise, remote, and government clients such as Toyota, GitLab, and the US Department of Commerce.

    In this conversation, Tammy and I discuss how leaders can establish a mindset that helps them lead remote teams more successfully. We discuss how to take on a placeless mindset, explore the importance of shifting from how to why, and the best starting points for a communication charter.
    Key Points
    Five key principles of a Placeless mindset:

    Embrace location independence over physical presence.
    Empower autonomous work with flexible schedules.
    Impact productivity with asynchronous communication and collaboration.
    Be open and transparent.
    Trust your colleague and employees.


    Fear of losing control tends to keep organizations from being able to make useful shifts in mindset.
    Leaders and organizations that move beyond the “how” of remote work and focus first on the “why” will have more sustainable success.
    Beware of simply trying to replicate what happened in the office. The whole point of remote work is that it is not like the office.
    Establish a communication charter. This makes it clear what tools are best — and also how to intervene when things don’t work as anticipated.

    Resources Mentioned

    Placeless Mindset by Workplaceless
    Goplaceless by Workplaceless

    Related Episodes

    Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223)
    How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464)
    How to Lead a Remote Team, with Susan Gerke (episode 465)

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  • Stefanie Johnson: Inclusify
    Stefanie Johnson is an author, professor, and keynote speaker who studies the intersection of leadership and diversity, focusing on how unconscious bias affects the evaluation of leaders and strategies that leaders can use to mitigate bias.

    Stefanie is an associate professor at the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business, teaching courses on leadership and inclusion. She is also a member of the Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches program and was selected for the 2020 Thinkers50 Radar List. She is a frequent contributor to Harvard Business Review and many other publications.

    In this conversation, Stefanie and I discuss her book Inclusify: The Power of Uniqueness and Belonging to Build Innovative Teams*. We look at how optimism may get in the way of building an inclusive workforce. Plus, Stefanie invites leaders to make public commitments and begin using metrics to track performance.
    Key Points

    Our two most basic human desires are to be unique and to belong.
    Leaders often end up with either cohesive teams of people who all act similarly or a lot of diverse individuals who don’t gel.
    Optimists intend well, but don’t initiate real change unless something triggers them to do so.
    Optimists should be more public with their commitment to be champions for uniqueness and belonging.
    Organizations and leaders should set metrics for diversity, just as they do for almost everything else.

    Resources Mentioned

    Inclusify: The Power of Uniqueness and Belonging to Build Innovative Teams* by Stefanie Johnson
    Inclusify Card Games by Stefanie Johnson

    Book Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Make Inclusion Happen, with Deepa Purushothaman (episode 307)
    How to Lead Meetings That Get Results, with Mamie Kanfer Stewart (episode 358)
    How to Support Women of Color, with Minda Harts (episode 506)

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  • BJ Fogg: Tiny Habits
    BJ Fogg is a behavior scientist, with deep experience in innovation and teaching. He's directed a research lab at Stanford University for over 20 years. He trains innovators to create solutions that influence behavior for good in the areas of health, sustainability, financial wellbeing, learning, productivity, and more.

    He is an expert in behavior change, from habit formation to company culture change. Fortune Magazine named him a "New Guru You Should Know" for his insights about mobile and social networks. His is the author of the New York Times bestseller Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything*.

    In this conversation, BJ and I discuss why new information alone doesn’t tend to lead to the behavior change most of us want. Instead, we explore BJ’s research and a key, 3-step process that will help all of us to create habits that stick. Plus, he points out that habits are even more about emotion than they are about repetition.
    Key Points

    Information does not lead to action.
    It’s a myth that it takes 21 or 66 days to create a habit. Repetition doesn't create habits. Emotions create habits.
    People change best by feeling good, not by feeling bad. The feeling of success is what wires in the habit.
    A garden is a useful analogy for habits. There is a season for every habit — and they often are not permanent.
    Create a tiny habit through an ABC process: anchor moment, a tiny behavior, and instant celebration.
    Avoid raising the bar on the tiny behavior. Do more if you want to, but don’t change the standard.

    Resources Mentioned

    Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything* by BJ Fogg
    BJ’s website

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Manage Your Inner Critic, with Tara Mohr (episode 232)
    Six Tactics for Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen (episode 337)
    Tie Leadership Development to Business Results, with Mark Allen (episode 435)

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  • Minda Harts: The Memo
    Minda Harts is the founder and CEO of The Memo and an advocate for women of color in the workplace. She is a sought-after speaker and thought-leader, frequently speaking on topics of advancing women of color, leadership, diversity, and entrepreneurship. In 2018, Minda was named as one of 25 Emerging Innovators by American Express. Minda has been a featured speaker at TEDx Harlem, Nike, Levi's, Twitch, Bloomberg, Google, LinkedIn, SXSW, and many other places.

    She is an adjunct assistant professor of public service at NYU’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. She also hosts Secure the Seat, a weekly career podcast for women of color. She's the author of the bestselling book The Memo: What Women of Color Need to Know to Secure a Seat at the Table*.

    In this conversation, Minda and I discuss the motivation for her work and the reality that recent events have been for women of color in the workplace. Minda shares some of the common obstacles that, good intentions aside, keep white folks from supporting women of color in their careers. Plus, we highlight some of the key offenses white leaders tend to make and how all of us can do better.
    Key Points

    While many leaders notice and consider the events of the day, the news often hits in a personal way for women of color.
    When asked, women of color tend to report that it’s white men who are showing up as sponsors and mentors.
    A key trigger point for women of color is to be described as “articulate.”
    The word “women” tends to be used as a one-size-fits-all. Be mindful that women don’t all experience the workplace in the same way.
    One key action white leaders can take to be a better success partner is ensuring the voices of women of color show up on diversity panels and as speakers.

    Resources Mentioned

    The Memo: What Women of Color Need to Know to Secure a Seat at the Table* by Minda Harts
    Minda’s website

    Book Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254)
    What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398)
    Journey Towards Diversity and Inclusion, with Willie Jackson (episode 441)

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  • Patrick Lencioni: The Motive
    Pat is one of the founders of The Table Group and is the pioneer of the organizational health movement. He is the author of 11 books, which have sold over 6 million copies and been translated into more than 30 languages.

    As President of the Table Group, Pat spends his time speaking and writing about leadership, teamwork, and organizational health and consulting with executives and their teams. He is the author of The Motive: Why So Many Leaders Abdicate Their Most Important Responsibilities*.

    In this conversation, Pat and I discuss the distinction between reward-centered leaders and service-orientated leaders. We explore the five omissions that reward-centered leaders tend to make and how to avoid these omissions. Plus, Pat introduces his Working Genius model.
    Key Points
    When leaders are motivated by personal reward, they will avoid the unpleasant situations and activities that leadership requires. -Patrick Lencioni
    5 Omissions of Reward-Centered Leaders:

    Developing the leadership team
    Managing subordinates (and making them manage theirs)
    Having difficult or uncomfortable conversations
    Running great team meetings
    Communicating constantly and repetitively to employees

    Many of the reward-focused CEOs I’ve known will attempt to justify their abdication of managing their people by saying, ‘I hire experienced executives and I trust them. They shouldn’t need me to manage them.’ Of course, this is inane. Managing someone is not a punitive activity, nor a sign of distrust. -Patrick Lencioni
    Resources Mentioned

    The Motive: Why So Many Leaders Abdicate Their Most Important Responsibilities* by Patrick Lencioni
    Working Genius assessment (use code COACHING for 50% off)

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage (episode 350)
    How to Lead Meetings That Get Results, with Mamie Kanfer Stewart (episode 358)
    Three Stories to Tell During Uncertainty, with David Hutchens (episode 486)

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  • Julia Taylor Kennedy: Coqual
    Julia Taylor Kennedy is an Executive Vice President at Coqual, driving cutting-edge research into the issues impacting today's professional workforce. She led The Sponsor Dividend research and co-authored Disabilities and Inclusion, Mission Critical: Unlocking the Value of Veterans in the Workforce, and The Power of the Purse: Engaging Women for Healthy Outcomes.

    She has spoken at the United Nations, the Carnegie Council for Ethics and International Affairs, the Conference Board — and many other places — and she’s been featured in The Washington Post, CBS News, Forbes, Time, and Harvard Business Review. Coqual recently released a new report, titled, The Power of Belonging: What It Is and Why It Matters in Today’s Workplace.
    Key Points

    A slight uptick in belonging leads to a sizable increase in engagement/loyalty.
    White men and women have the highest belonging scores. Black and Asian women have the lowest.
    Organizations can move beyond espousing support by setting clear metrics and also inviting in external stakeholders for accountability.
    Senior leaders set the tone for what the organization does (or does not do) to support belonging.
    While there is not yet enough action from white, straight leaders, there is movement in espoused support and concern for belonging.

    Resources Mentioned

    The Power of Belonging by Coqual
    How to Be an Antiracist* by Ibram X. Kendi
    White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism* by Robin DiAngelo

    Related Episodes

    What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398)
    Journey Towards Diversity and Inclusion, with Willie Jackson (episode 441)
    Changed My Mind (Dave’s Journal)
    Making the Most of Mentoring (audio course)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*.
    Listener Questions

    Joyce asked our advice on organizational culture assessments.
    Nina wondered how to create a cohesive culture which allows for unique cultures in each workforce segment.
    Bonni and Dave shared some recent technology they are playing with, including 1Password and Readwise.

    Resources Mentioned

    Human Synergistics
    1Password
    Readwise*

    Related Episodes

    The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens (episode 148)
    How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage (episode 350)
    The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363)
    Get Smart About Assessments, with Ken Nowack (episode 371)

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  • Chris Hogan: Everyday Millionaires
    Chris Hogan is a best-selling author, a personal finance expert, and America’s leading voice on retirement, investing, and building wealth. His goal is to help as many people as possible avoid financial traps and set their families up for the future.

    His book Retire Inspired: It’s Not an Age; It’s a Financial Number* is a number one national best seller, and The Chris Hogan Show has millions of downloads. He is also the author of Everyday Millionaires: How Ordinary People Built Extraordinary Wealth―and How You Can Too*.

    In this conversation, Chris and I discuss the national study that his organization conducted on everyday millionaires. We address some of the common misconceptions about millionaires. Plus, we detail both the mindset and behaviors that millionaires have that support the creation of wealth.
    Key Points

    The top three occupations for millionaires are engineer, accountant, and teacher.
    Millionaires steer clear of debt.
    Millionaires have a mentality of abundance vs. scarcity. They embrace change and usually see adversity as an opportunity for growth.
    Millionaires are frugal, not flashy. They spend less than the general population on groceries, restaurants and clothing.
    Employer sponsored retirement plans are a key vehicle the vast majority of millionaires use to build wealth.
    Only 1 in 5 millionaires receive any kind of inheritance.

    Resources Mentioned

    Everyday Millionaires: How Ordinary People Built Extraordinary Wealth―and How You Can Too* by Chris Hogan
    The Chris Hogan Show

    Related Episodes

    Improve Your Financial Intelligence, with Joe Knight (episode 244)
    Four Rules to Get Control of Your Money, with Jesse Mecham (episode 356)
    Dumb Things Smart People Do With Money, with Jill Schlesinger (episode 396)

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  • Andrea Wanerstrand: Microsoft & International Coach Federation
    Andrea Wanerstrand is a leadership coach and head of Microsoft Worldwide Learning Coaching Programs. Andrea has 15+ years of international experience in organizations ranging from 50 to over 150,000+ employees. She has a multi-industry background including technology solutions and services, business management consulting, and telecommunications.

    Andrea’s expertise is in leading the development and management of large-scale global coaching & leadership development programs specializing in customer centric organizations. In addition to leading the global coaching programs at Microsoft, she is an International Coaching Federation (ICF) PCC certified leadership coach, serves as a current Board Member on the ICF Global Board of Directors, and is a Fellow at the Institute of Coaching – Harvard McLean.

    In this conversation, Andrea and I discuss how the conversation about coaching culture started at Microsoft and how they began to bring this intention into practice. Plus, she shares what worked in designed programs for Microsoft leaders that helped in developing coaching skills and support the success of the entire organization.
    Key Points
    In their report on Building a Coaching Culture with Managers and Leadership, the International Coach Federation and Human Capital Institute say:
    Organizations with a strong coaching culture report recent revenue above their industry peer group (51% of organizations compared to 38% of other responding organizations).
    Sixty-four percent of respondents in organizations with strong coaching cultures report the presence of all three modalities, compared to 33% of respondents in organizations without strong coaching cultures.
    Three modalities of coaching:

    Coaching Services: formal global solutions for engaging with point in time development focused coaching (can leverage internal or external coaches).
    Coaching Capabilities: in the moment leadership behavior that facilitates empowerment, learning and activates a growth mindset.
    Coaching Champions: A common framework and approach to create and support a community of leaders/manager as well as internal coaches who are held to common standards and practices fostering coaching capabilities.

    Resources Mentioned

    Andrea Wanerstrand

    Related Episodes

    How to Improve Your Coaching Skills, with Tom Henschel (episode 190)
    These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237)
    Move Coaching from Theory to Practice, with Jason Weeman (episode 493)

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  • Oscar Trimboli: Deep Listening
    Oscar is a mentor, coach, speaker, and author. He was a director at Microsoft for over a decade and headed up the MS Office division in Australia.

    Today, Oscar works with leadership teams and their organizations on the importance of clarity to create change, how to embrace the digital economy, and the role values play in the achievement of your purpose. He is the author of Deep Listening: Impact Beyond Words*.

    In this conversation, Oscar details the four habits that tend to derail our listening. We explore the patterns and behaviors of each habit, and how we can work to do better. Plus, Oscar invites us to notice feelings instead of words — as well as HOW people are saying things, not just WHAT they are saying.
    Key Points
    Four habits that derail listening:

    Dramatic Listener

    They get engrossed in the emotion and want to become an actor in it. Dramatic listeners tend to get caught up in the problem so much so that they don’t hear the idea or the solution. They may come away from an interaction feeling like they’ve really connected when in fact, they haven’t.

    Interrupting Listener

    We notice these people the most. They are coming from a place of concern and tend to listen to fix and solve the problem. They finish sentences wrongly and many listen for places to jump in as much as they are listening for the words.

    Lost Listener

    These listeners tend to zone out and appear not present. Lost listeners may be focused on something else. Technology devices have the potential to distract them substantially.

    Shrewd Listener

    These listeners are solving the current problem and also the next problem. They may create problems in their own mind that aren’t even what speaker said. They are smart enough not to interrupt, and often appear very engaged, but are not necessarily listening.
    Resources Mentioned

    Oscar’s Listening Quiz
    Deep Listening: Impact Beyond Words* by Oscar Trimboli
    The Four Villains of Listening (Deep Listening podcast)

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Deep Listening in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344)
    Get Better at Deep Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 408)
    The Way to Be More Coach-Like, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 458)

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  • Annie Duke: How to Decide
    Annie Duke is an author, corporate speaker, and consultant in the decision-making space. As a former professional poker player, Annie won more than $4 million in tournament poker before retiring from the game in 2012.

    Prior to becoming a professional player, Annie was awarded a National Science Foundation Fellowship to study Cognitive Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the co-founder of The Alliance for Decision Education, a non-profit whose mission to improve lives by empowering students through decision skills education.

    Annie is the author of Thinking in Bets* and her newest book, How to Decide: Simple Tools for Making Better Choices*.
    Key Points

    Better decision-making aims to reduce resulting and hindsight bias.
    Avoid using a pro/cons list in decision-making, as it tends to reinforce biases you already have.
    Use a decision tree to document potential decisions, possible outcomes, and the likelihood those outcomes will occur.
    More people being involved in a decision is helpful, assuming you are actually leveraging each person’s independent thinking.
    Negative thinking will help you foresee potential problems along the path of your decision so you can do a better job of mitigating issues before they occur.

    Resources Mentioned

    How to Decide: Simple Tools for Making Better Choices* by Annie Duke
    Thinking, Fast and Slow* by Daniel Kahneman
    The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right* by Atul Gawande
    The Alliance for Decision Education

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from How to Decide in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How Women Make Stronger, Smarter Choices, with Therese Huston (episode 255)
    How to Approach Corporate Budgeting, with Jody Wodrich (episode 355)
    How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*.
    Listener Questions

    Rajat asked us about the best ways to create management structures in his organization.
    Cathy wondered how we let things go in moments of personal frustration.
    Janet asked advice for forming and sustaining business partnership and alliances.

    Resources Mentioned

    Leadership and Self-Deception: Getting Out of the Box* by The Arbinger Institute
    Scaling Up: How a Few Companies Make It...and Why the Rest Don't* by Verne Harnish
    Traction: Get a Grip on Your Business* by Gino Wickman
    Clockwork: Design Your Business to Run Itself* by Mike Michalowicz
    Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't* by Jim Collins

    Related Episodes

    Three Keys to Effective Business Alliances, with Aaron Kent (episode 162)
    How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192)
    The Truth and Lies of Performance Management, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 361)
    Performance Measurement That Gets Results, with Stacey Barr (episode 419)

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  • Kwame Christian: Negotiate Anything
    Kwame Christian is the Director of the American Negotiation Institute and business lawyer at Carlile Patchen & Murphy. His popular TED talk is titled Finding Confidence in Conflict.

    Today, he’s working extensively with organizations to help them improve their skills on negotiation and conflict resolution. Kwame hosts the top negotiation podcast, Negotiate Anything and is the author of the book Finding Confidence in Conflict: How to Negotiate Anything and Live Your Best Life*.
    Key Points
    Use the compassionate curiosity framework:

    Acknowledge and validate emotions
    Get curious with compassion
    Joint problem solving


    If a difficult situation needs to be discussed, giving a heads up to the other party in advance helps them to work through the initial, emotional reaction and reset for a more productive conversation.
    Separating conversations about the content or service being offered from the deal itself can be useful to focus energy in the right places at the right time. This is especially useful for creative folks or those who might be highly sensitive to negotiations.
    When dealing with someone who is not behaving well, use the phrase “The problem is…” as a transition point that provides you more agency in the conversation.

    Resources Mentioned

    Free Negotiation Guides from Kwame
    Negotiate Anything podcast
    Finding Confidence in Conflict: How to Negotiate Anything and Live Your Best Life* by Kwame Christian

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Finding Confidence in Conflict in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth, with Chris Hadfield (episode 149)
    The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344)
    How to Find Confidence in Conflict, with Kwame Christian (episode 380)

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  • Andy Kaufman: People and Projects Podcast
    Andy is a keynote speaker and author on leadership and project management. He’s President of the Institute for Leadership Excellence & Development and works with organizations around the world, helping them improve their ability to deliver projects & lead teams. He’s also a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®) and a member of the Project Management Institute (PMI®).

    Andy is author of Navigating the Winds of Change: Staying on Course in Business & in Life, Shining the Light on The Secret and an e-book entitled How to Organize Your Inbox & Get Rid of E-Mail Clutter and he’s the host of the People and Projects Podcast.
    Key Points

    Change is inevitable — and should not be viewed as the enemy.
    Often, our training and education tends to lead us towards not thinking in the terms of quick wins.
    Agile is about incremental delivery.
    Frequency is valued. Our bias should be towards shorter intervals.
    Quick wins ultimately help you generate much faster feedback, leading to future steps.

    Resources Mentioned

    People and Projects Podcast by Andy Kaufman

    Related Episodes

    How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249)
    The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363)
    How to Pivot Quickly, with Steve Blank (episode 476)

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  • Stephen Hart: Trailblazers.FM
    Stephen is the host of the podcast Trailblazers.FM, helping entrepreneurs and leaders build amazing personal brands that are impactful, relatable and profitable. He features the stories of brilliant Black men and women – to help teach actionable strategies, valuable tactics and innovative tools that they can use on the journey to becoming transformative trailblazers.

    He’s also the creator of Brand You Academy* which helps busy, heart-centered entrepreneurs and leaders through a proven step by step process to build an amazing personal brand that is authentic, impactful and profitable. Use coupon code CFL200 if you decide to dive in on Stephen’s course.

    In this conversation, Stephen and I go beyond creating a LinkedIn profile and discuss how to be more proactive on LinkedIn. By writing articles, creating short videos, or even streaming, you can gain organic attention on LinkedIn that isn’t always as accessible on other social media platforms. We discuss some of the key strategies to start and sustain a presence on LinkedIn.
    Key Points

    Articles can be used effectively to create content if you’re not yet ready for video, but still interested in building your personal brand.
    Consider a series of articles or other content that highlight your personal brand and speak to your leadership credibility.
    Use short videos (3-5 minutes) to tell a story that leads to a call to action. LinkedIn videos typically get more organic views than other social platforms.
    Live videos or steaming engage real-time conversations to have dialogue that invites relationships to go further.

    Resources Mentioned

    Brand You Academy* (use coupon code CFL200 for $200 off)

    Related Episodes

    How to Write a Killer LinkedIn Profile, with Brenda Bernstein (episode 285)
    Permission to Be Yourself, with Bar Schwartz (episode 414)
    Find Your Leadership Voice, with Johanna Nalau (episode 420)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*.
    Listener Questions

    Liz wondered how a manager can empathize with an employee while continuing to uphold the businesses needs.
    Chris asked about fostering innovation while maintaining business efficiency.
    Colette wanted to know what activity was most helpful for us to decide the next direction of our careers.
    Dave and Bonni asked each other about what is giving life right now, and what is taking life away.

    Resources Mentioned

    7 Habits of Highly Effective People* by Stephen Covey
    Design Thinking Methods: Affinity Diagrams by Matthew Weprin

    Related Episodes

    How to Lead Part-Time Staff, with Chris Deferio (episode 289)
    How to Work With an Executive Recruiter, with Becky deSouza (episode 406)
    How to Build an Invincible Company, with Alex Osterwalder (episode 470)

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  • Jason Weeman: Upwork
    Jason Weeman works to build meaningful relationships by creating experiences that are inspiring and transformational. He has worked for some of the top brands in the world, including Apple, LinkedIn, and Upwork. Today, he is the head of corporate learning and development at Upwork. One of the key areas of focus for his team and him is building a coaching culture.

    In this conversation, Jason and I discuss how his team was a catalyst for coaching culture at Upwork. We discuss what worked to influence culture in this way, what didn’t work, and the lessons they learned along the way.
    Key Points
    Be lazy, be curious, be often. -Michael Bungay Stanier

    Organizations are trying to create a culture for coaching, but not giving the feedback. The stronger that we develop a sense of common language on feedback, the better we get on quality.
    People sometimes don’t believe it should be so simple…so they try to make coaching development too complicated.
    Resist the urge to focus too much on data and tracking.
    Significant buy-in from executive leadership is critical for the success of a coaching program like this. Also, having a culture of “we” being in this together makes all the difference.

    Resources Mentioned

    Life at Upwork
    The Coaching Habit workshop
    The Last Feedback Workshop You’ll Ever Need

    Related Episodes

    These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237)
    How to Get the Ideal Team Player, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 301)
    How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage (episode 350)

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  • Mikaila Ulmer: Bee Fearless
    Mikaila Ulmer is a 15-year-old social entrepreneur, bee ambassador, educator and student. She founded her Me & the Bees Lemonade business when she was just four years old, and over the past decade has sold over 1 million bottles across 1,500 stores in the United States. Her appearance on Shark Tank at age nine scored a $60,000 investment from Daymond John.

    Mikaila has established herself as a voice of guidance for others, appearing on Good Morning America, The Today Show, 20/20, ABC World News Tonight, and many other venues. She was selected as one of Time magazine’s 30 Most Influential Teens and for Ebony Magazine’s Ebony Power100 #Black Excellence. She is the author of the new book, Bee Fearless: Dream Like a Kid*.

    In this conversation, Mikaila discuss what inspired her to start her business and the importance of a larger mission behind work. She talks about the importance of passion, balancing her work with her schooling, and how to support kids in doing great things. Plus, she shares what she’s learned along the way on turning a dream into reality.
    Key Points

    Turn adversity into advantage.
    It’s more enjoyable to build a business when you not only have hands-on experience and know-how, but passion.
    Big news needs to be approached with careful consideration.
    Aim to be good and kind in running a business.

    Resources Mentioned

    Bee Fearless: Dream Like a Kid* by Mikaila Ulmer

    Related Episodes

    How to Transform Your Limitations Into Advantages, with Mark Barden (episode 207)
    How Leaders Build, with Guy Raz (episode 491)
    If You Build It, They Will Come (Dave’s Journal)

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  • Guy Raz: How I Built This
    Guy Raz is the creator and host of the popular podcasts How I Built This, Wisdom from the Top, and The Rewind on Spotify. He’s also the co-creator of the acclaimed podcasts TED Radio Hour and the children’s programs Wow in the World and Two Whats?! and a Wow!. He’s received the Edward R. Murrow Award, the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize, the National Headliner Award, and many others.

    In 2017, Guy became the first person in the history of podcasting to have three shows in the top 20 on the Apple Podcast charts. He’s the author of the new book, How I Built This: The Unexpected Path to Success From the World’s Most Inspiring Entrepreneurs*.

    In this conversation, Guy and I discuss what he’s discovered from interviewing the world’s most successful entrepreneurs on How I Built This. We profile a few of the insightful stories that he’s captured in his new book and dispel some of the common myths. Plus, we explore how happiness and kindness play such an important role in building something new.
    Key Points

    Successful entrepreneurs are able to make the distinction between what is actually dangerous and what is just scary.
    We often think about entrepreneurs as solo leaders, but almost always there is a critical partner who complements their strengths.
    It is common for entrepreneurs to have a day job or other fallback plan as they start something new.
    Money is important, but it’s almost never the driving factor motivating entrepreneurs who have success in the long-run.
    Kindness takes leaders a long way when starting a business.

    Resources Mentioned

    How I Built This: The Unexpected Path to Success From the World’s Most Inspiring Entrepreneurs* by Guy Raz
    How I Built This podcast

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from How I Built This in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Be a Non-Conformist, with Adam Grant (episode 238)
    Ideas Worth Stealing From Top Entrepreneurs, with Dorie Clark (episode 318)
    How to Be a Happier Person, with Neil Pasricha (episode 334)
    Serve Others Through Marketing, with Seth Godin (episode 381)

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  • Joseph Getuno
    Joseph is a finance director based in Mauritius. He’s a longtime listener from the show and a member of the Coaching for Leaders Academy.

    In this conversation, Joseph and I discuss how he captures ideas from audio podcasts and motivates himself to implement what he’s discovered. We also highlight the value in establishing team guidelines, zeroing in on self-awareness, and the power of consistency. Plus, he highlights the work of key experts that have sharped his own leadership development.
    Key Points

    Listen to an audio podcast one time through. Then, review a second time at higher speed to capture the key ideas from the conversation.
    Insights and ideas are a starting point, but of little value without action. Find a way to support daily action in your development.
    Establishing team guidelines can change the entire dynamic of culture in the organization.
    Consistency isn’t a flashy word, but it’s a key factor in how much movement you’re able to create as a leader.

    Related Episodes

    How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192)
    How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404)
    The Way to Be More Self-Aware, with Tasha Eurich (episode 442)
    The Value of Being Uncomfortable, with Neil Pasricha (episode 448)
    How to Motivate Leaders, with John Maxwell (episode 452)

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    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.