Afleveringen

  • The one thing this current government has given us is a lot to talk about in rural media!

    Recorded on the Saturday prior to the Groundswell protest, ACT Party Leader David Seymour joined Sarah to discuss a wide range of government policy that is overwhelming the primary sector that has seen them take to the streets in their tractors.

    They discuss the sector's representation in Wellington, hate speech by politicians towards farmers to Rogernomics.

    Sarah has an entertaining one-hour chat with the ACT Party leader's stance on the RMA, the Zero Carbon Act through to Mental Health and pine trees.

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands Co-Operative for partnering with Sarah's Country this season!

  • As the COP26 Climate Change Summit has concluded, a serendipitous scientific finding at Lincoln University virtually eliminates the methane emitted from effluent ponds and if uptook by 2030 will half dairy's emmission targets.

    As this week's Sarah's Country Change Maker, Mike Manning, General Manager Innovation and Strategy at Ravensdown, explains the breakthrough discovery of the EcoPond system to target methane with an additive normally used in the treatment of drinking water.

    Nearly all dairy farms use effluent ponds and they are the second-largest source of on-farm methane emissions. An average NZ dairy farm of around 400 cows that installed EcoPond could cut total farm methane emissions by about 4 to 5%, depending on the individual farm.

    They also found that EcoPond reduced the risk of Dissolved Reactive Phosphate loss to water by up to 99% meaning that this essential nutrient can be recycled with reduced risk of water contamination. The EcoPond system also strips out E.coli so that the dairy effluent is much safer to irrigate to pasture.

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands Co-Operative for partnering with Sarah's Country this season!

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  • What led me to Sue was a string of fate, and now I want to share her with the world as this week's Sarah's Country Sister.

    Sue McGaw is a specialist native plant consultant from North Canterbury who works with farmers to design their riparian plantings into biodiversity nodes to ensure 99% success rate, all year round bird feed, resilence from pests, weeds, droughts, and floods and Rongoā Māori, the traditional healing properties.

    At 63 years old, after 25 years of landscape design, Sue's imposter syndrome that she no one would listen to her without a Master's she embarked on completing in Ecology.

    Sue's lifelong mission is to pass on her knowledge to catchment groups and farmers to get it right the first time and not just plant what you like the look of!

    To connect with Sue feel free to email her, gayton.gardens@xtra.co.nz.

  • We are excited for you to meet the three emerging food and fibre sector leaders who have been awarded the 2022 Nuffield New Zealand Farming Scholarships.

    This group comes from the most diverse range of backgrounds we have seen in recent times and each of the scholars brings talent, passion, perspective, and a track record of performance.

    Covid 19 restrictions mean this year’s scholarship recipients’ formal awards ceremony at Parliament, will be delayed until February 2022, when Minister O’Connor will award the scholarships in person.

    In this episode, you will meet the 2022 Nuffield New Zealand Farming Scholarship recipients along with CEO for the New Zealand Rural Leadership Trust (NZRLT), Chris Parsons as this week's Change Makers.

    Parmindar Singh, a Waikato based Dairy Farm Manager, Company Director, and recent master’s graduate.

    Anthony Taueki, a horticulturalist from Hawke’s Bay, Tū Te Wana Kaiako at Fruition Horticulture, and a Councillor for the Youth Food and Fibre Network.

    Completing the trio is Wellington-based Lucie Douma, Principal Adviser for the Ministry for Primary Industries. Lucie is a master’s graduate from Oxford’s Mansfield College and

    from a Southland farming background along with CEO of Rural Leaders, Chris Parsons.

    For more on the 2022 Value Chain Innovation Programme:

    Rural Leaders have made the decision to shift the Value Chain Innovation Programme date from Mid-January to May next year.

    For more information on the programme and how to apply: https://ruralleaders.co.nz/value-chain/

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands Co-Operative for partnering with Sarah's Country this season

  • Brave leadership has been a fabric of our primary sector for the past century and now is a time to continue that attitude in the face of what many think is just a New Zealand government challenge when our farming cousins around the world are facing the same challenges.

    Science entrepreneur and agri-business commentator, Anna Campbell, is walking the talk transitioning from AbacusBio, a highly respected science, and technology firm operating from offices in Dunedin and Rotorua New Zealand, and Edinburgh, United Kingdom, to co-founding natural health business, Zestt Wellness, to support immunity and improve lung health.

    As this week's Sarah's Country Sisters, Anna and Sarah discuss:

    - Her opinion's on New Zealand food & fibre's science commercialization moving to private equity and offshore capital markets.

    - Her empathy attending the last farmer protest with her farming mum and her son of agriculturalists turned off a career in the sector along with the international animal scientists saying they feel they will be the last generation, the pressures on the livestock industry is a global challenge.

    - The opportunities for New Zealand's natural health products from plants are being hindered by our antiquated regulation and international scientific collaboration.

    - Her advice on women leadership in the sector by men leading that change by opening doors and taking women seriously, as well as women deepening their networks with other women.

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands Co-Operative for partnering with Sarah's Country this season.

  • Brave leadership has been a fabric of our primary sector for the past century and now is a time to continue that attitude in the face of what many think is just a New Zealand government challenge when our farming cousins around the world are facing the same challenges.

    Science entrepreneur and agri-business commentator, Anna Campbell, is walking the talk transitioning from AbacusBio, a highly respected science, and technology firm operating from offices in Dunedin and Rotorua New Zealand, and Edinburgh, United Kingdom, to co-founding natural health business, Zestt Wellness, to support immunity and improve lung health.

    As this week's Sarah's Country Sisters, Anna and Sarah discuss:

    - Her opinion's on New Zealand food & fibre's science commercialization moving to private equity and offshore capital markets.

    - Her empathy attending the last farmer protest with her farming mum and her son of agriculturalists turned off a career in the sector along with the international animal scientists saying they feel they will be the last generation, the pressures on the livestock industry is a global challenge.

    - The opportunities for New Zealand's natural health products from plants are being hindered by our antiquated regulation and international scientific collaboration.

    - Her advice on women leadership in the sector by men leading that change by opening doors and taking women seriously, as well as women deepening their networks with other women.

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands Co-Operative for partnering with Sarah's Country this season.

  • Whatever your thoughts or knowledge are about cannabis, the New Zealand government believes in the future of establishing evidence-based medical cannabis cultivation practices with the awarding of funds to Lincoln University-based, Greenlab.

    Greenlab aims to generate standard cultivation protocols for a range of New Zealand genetics with the optimized pharmaceutical compounds required by doctors and needed by patients to improve their quality of life.

    Dr. Rupinder Brar & Dr. Parmjit Randhawa, co-founders of Greenlab join Sarah as this week's Change Maker to explain how the unique research could position New Zealand as the market leader in herbal medicine as the pharmaceutical industry is running out of options for healthcare.

    Whilst New Zealand farmers and growers won't necessarily be able to capture a slice of the green pie on the ground, there are some excellent messages in the global trend for nutraceuticals - let food be thy medicine - and our agronomic knowledge to apply that.

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands for supporting Sarah's Country this season!

    To contact the show email sarah@sarahscountry.com

  • The last 5 years for New Zealand's largest rural supply co-operative have been disruptive to ensure they are positioned to support their shareholders into the future.

    Newly appointed CEO, Tanya Houghton has a fresh approach to leadership that is being well-received across the board.

    Sarah caught up with Tanya as part of Sarah's Country sisters to discuss how to lead a team in a time of uncertainty, her thoughts on balancing the books of farmers with lower prices and that of the co-operative and her plan to navigate the challenges ahead in her own style of leadership.

    Following the recent announcement of an $8.1 million net profit before tax and rebates for the 20/21 financial year described by Chair Rob Hewett as a pass mark with a $2.7 billion turnover, Tanya has turned her first efforts to people & culture.

    Thank you so much to our mates at Farmlands for supporting us this season!

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

  • Many farmers across New Zealand fear the future sheep farming faces is the viability of the business model in the face of trees on hill country.

    The merger of Primary Wool Co-Operative & Wools of New Zealand closes on the 4th of November and maybe the ticket to contracting the fragmented industry to provide more value behind the farm gate.

    As this week's Change Maker, Sarah catches up with Richard Young, Chair of Primary Wool Co-Operative to discuss what the merger will mean for growers, where the strong wool price needs to be to be sustainable, and how the capitally constrained industry can emerge from the doldrums to capture the value of 'eco-consumerism'.

    For more information on the merger, visit: https://primarywool.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Information-booklet.pdf

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands Co-Operative for partnering with Sarah's Country this season.

  • Positive community outcomes are what drive this Central Otago sheep & beef farmer who has found herself supporting the diversity of opinion towards environmental progress.

    Emma Crutchley, farming with her husband in the Maniototo, has a wide range of experience from a career in agronomy to governance in water management aware that her biggest strength she offers is facilitating challenging conversations.

    "I've learned that you have a limited time so don't spread yourself too thin. Try and find the spot where you can use your skillset to have the biggest influence with the time you have available to contribute," Emma Crutchley.

    As this week's Sarah's Country Sister, Emma has many pleas for the farming sector to come together around the various strategies to achieve environmental excellence and that outside thinking is needed.

    Tiaki Maniototo is an example of Emma's involvement in sourcing $4.5million in government funding to plant 90,000 native plants, 200km of fencing, preserve the rare native fish and enhance recreational areas for all of the community to access the newly planted areas.

    Sarah & Emma discuss how projects can bring the wider community together on their shared values bridging the divide so they have a collective sense of achievement and connection to their catchment.

    Click here to read Emma's Kellogg's report "Water sharing in a water-short catchment"

    Subscribe to Sarah’s Country on the podcast and if you love us, please leave a review!

    Thank you so much to our mates at Farmlands for supporting us this season!

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

  • Did you know that New Zealand farmers in their 40's are having heart attacks?

    It's time to reframe what it means to be a top farmer. It's not about what people think of you as the stress unbalances the economics of your farm and life.

    Being a Triple-A farmer is assessing, adapting, and adjusting your farm to have a holistic approach to wellbeing. From the books to the bed, being successful is having your physical, mental, social, and business wellbeing in order right across the board.

    In this week's Opinion Maker, Sarah discusses the fundamentals of having a balanced life as every aspect is interconnected. Physical pain creates fatigue which leads to poor mental performance and ultimately business performance.

    Throughout this episode, Sarah talks to others involved in a unique new program, FarmFlex, from a rural accountant, personal trainer, environmental consultant, insurance advisors.

    In this week's Opinion Maker, Sarah discusses the fundamentals of having a balanced life as every aspect is interconnected. Physical pain creates fatigue which leads to poor mental performance and ultimately business performance.

    Throughout this episode, Sarah talks to others involved in a unique new program, FarmFlex, from a rural accountant, personal trainer, environmental consultant, insurance advisors.

    In this episode, we learn about great tips and advice from:

    - Elle Perriam, founder of Will to Live NZ Charitable Trust, supports farmers with free private phycologists and what she's discovered about the fundamentals of stress.

    - Erica Van Reenan, managing director AgFirst Manawatu, in how she's learned that to achieve good environmental and business outcomes people are at the heart of decision making.

    - Rahui Corbett, partner at rural accountancy, Morrison Creed on how to cashflow forecast in uncertain times.

    - Matt Wells, wellness coach at The Rec Room, hits home the importance of physical health on overall performance and reducing fatigue from niggly injuries.

    - Pierre Schroeder, the principal adviser at Thrive, highlights the value of human resources in your farming operation and how putting yourself & people first can save you money.

    For more information about FarmFlex launching on 5th November 2021, visit https://www.facebook.com/Farmflex2021 or contact the team at Thrive.

    Thank you so much to our mates at Farmlands for supporting us this season!

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

  • Cherry-picking facts and non or discounted 'accounting' is happening everywhere across the conversation of climate change and food production.

    One New Zealand scientist wants the narrative to include the full energy analysis of our food production which doesn't look good for plant-based proteins or vertical farming.

    Craig Anderson's webinar "Is energy the Achilles heel of agriculture" has caught many people's attention and highlighted the opportunity to focus on the full life cycle analysis, instead of just greenhouse gas emissions.

    As this week's Change Maker, Sarah learns more about the observations Craig is making when we shift our thinking to the energy or calorie profile of food.

    "The green revolution of agriculture has seen more energy/per kg used to produce 1kg of calories. Whilst we can all make reductions on farm, lot of that is coming from the process after the farm-gate. New Zealand has an opportunity to reframe the story," explains Craig.

    More resources as explained in the podcast:

    - Craig's presentation - watch here

    - Craig's latest opinion piece on Newsroom 'The energy dilemma of eating' - read here

    Subscribe to Sarah’s Country on the podcast and if you love us, please leave a review!

    Thank you so much to our mates at Farmlands for supporting us this season!

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

  • What has been polarising the New Zealand farming community for some time is a word!

    Yep, that's right. The word 'regenerative'. Unable to be pigeonhole or tamed by certification. So why do we care so much about it?

    It's because the principles of regenerative resonate so deeply with New Zealand's essence of how we naturally care for the environment that we have become so passionate about our identity being under threat.

    In the Regenerative Agriculture Market Scan & Consumer Insights report released this week, showed here is a significant opportunity for New Zealand to position itself to take advantage of the global regenerative agriculture trend, according to research commissioned by Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) and New Zealand Winegrowers (NZW).

    In this week's Opinion Maker, Sarah discusses how we can lead the world with our farming practices on the groundswell surrounding the word, 'regenerative.'

    This episode features the report's author, Mike Lee from Alpha Food Labs (USA), Steve Smith, Chair of Primary Sector Council and representing the NZ Winegrowers as well as Beef + Lamb NZ's Market Development Manager, Nick Beeby.

    For more information about Sarah's Country, visit www.sarahscountry.com

    Subscribe to Sarah’s Country on the podcast and if you love us, please leave a review!

    Thank you so much to our mates at Farmlands for supporting us this season!

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

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  • Did you know over 200,000 treated and broken timber vineyard posts every year discarded wood destined for landfills?

    Greg Coppell found himself looking to fence off his farm on a shoestring budget and Stu Dudley his mate works in the viticulture industry which was the onus for creating REPOST, this great company in Marlborough recycling what has been a waste product for the vineyard industry into a new life of farms repurposing posts as a cheap, no-fuss fencing solution for fencing off waterways on farms across the country.

    This truly is saving money and the environment as Sarah's Country's Change Maker this week!

    For more information on REPOST visit, https://repost.co.nz/about/

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands for partnering with us this Spring. As NZ's largest farmer-owned co-operative head to shop.farmlands.co.nz for your knowledge & advice across the country.

    visit www.sarahscountry.com

    Subscribe to Sarah’s Country on the podcast and if you love us, please leave a review!

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

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  • She oozes passion for our food storytellers to lead the next generation of New Zealand's identity as a proud food-producing nation. But she says there is no time to rest on our laurels and we must come together around our proposed national food strategy, Mana Kai, for which she is on the steering group for.

    "We have had the moral and environment high ground for so long. The push back that we are better than the rest of the world is really dangerous as other countries can frog-jump us with our complacency," Angela Clifford, Eat NZ.

    This week's Change Maker is Angela Clifford, founder of Eat New Zealand, a non-profit organisation on a mission to be the bridge of the New Zealand food movement dedicated to connecting people to our land, through our food.

    Eat New NZ is a collective of chefs, producers, media, tourism, and event operators, who have all been inspired to create a national platform to promote and champion our best food, drink, and culinary tourism opportunities.

    Sarah & Angela discuss opportunities to capture our national & indigenous values with our own form of geographical indicators, provenance & terroir.

    Angela, along with her wine-maker husband spent 15 years in the Barossa Valley, Australia deeply involved in the storytelling through wine events & farmer markets. When they returned home to North Canterbury, where Nick was involved in the establishment of Greystone Wines, Angela spread her wings to wrap the food of the region together with the wine involving chefs, tourism, and media.

    Now in 2021, Eat New Zealand is holding the next installment of the Food Hui in Christchurch 1-2 November to discuss how we can incorporate a values-based framework or national food strategy into our food system, the development of food communities through local food networks, and regenerative food tourism to understand how they’ll play an important role in our food security and food celebration moving forwards.

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands for partnering with us this Spring. As NZ's largest farmer-owned co-operative head to shop.farmlands.co.nz for your knowledge & advice across the country.

    visit www.sarahscountry.com

    Subscribe to Sarah’s Country on the podcast and if you love us, please leave a review!

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

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  • We are heavily assuming if you are reading this article you are already well educated on the nutrition and climate science that supports grass-fed, pasture-raised beef and lamb from New Zealand.

    But to also go on to assume that just because consumers may be wealthy and educated, doesn't necessarily mean they will choose to purchase red meat as often as they once did. They have been afforded the privilege of having a food identity.

    You can throw all of the complex science at the human health vs planetary health debate or the plant vs meat debate, but it will mean nothing without cohesive global storytelling as this week's guests from around the world highlight.

    Over the course of 3 months, Sarah Perriam has been collecting interviews from experts across the globe for this very special Opinion Maker episode to try and answer the burning question for New Zealand's sheep & beef farmers, "How does meat compete with the negative narrative globally?"

    This episode features :

    Prof. Frederic Leroy, Professor of Food Science and Biotechnology Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium, presented at both the 2019 Red Meat Sector Conference (NZ) and presented at Multiscapes, the international virtual conference in 2021 (NZ) and explains the complex, binary discussion surrounding meat. Fiona Windle, Head Nutritionist at Beef + Lamb NZ who highlights the ever-evolving narrative towards meat that lacks nutritional importance when discussing climate change off the back of the Barnsley report published in 2021 that illustrates substituting meat from the average diet would lead to only a 3-4% decrease in an individual's lifetime global warming impact.Anne Mottet, Sustainable livestock development at United Nations Food & Agriculture Organisation, France, discusses balancing the Sustainable Development Goals of nutritional needs as discussed at the 2021 UN Food Systems Summit with the climate needs on the table at 2021 UN COP26. Kate Gower-James, Aitkens Ranch based in San Francisco about the US Wholefoods consumer, the trends of food identity, trusting your meat marketer to keep up with the latest consumer trends, and how positioning accredited storytelling on meat is important.Laura Ryan, the co-founder of the Global Meat Alliance, has rallied the global red meat community to work together on the common challenges, collaborating through COVID in the lead-up to COP26.Dave Courtney, Silver Fern Farms chief customer officer discussing their research and pilot for carbon-neutral meat and regenerative agriculture and how NZ sheep & beef farmers can prepare themselves for these trends.
  • From farm to fork, food is the least digitized supply chain. However, with the recent advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and big data analytics, and for the first time in human history, it’s now practical to digitize agriculture and its supply chain.

    The billion-dollar space race is allowing connectivity to sensors like never before which will transform how we collect data in areas without cellphone coverage.

    This week's Change Maker is Dr. Sara Spangelo, Founder & CEO of Swarm who are rumored to have just sold their company to Elon Musk's SpaceX, about how New Zealand is leading the pack in buying up low-cost satellite technology.

    Rural connectivity in New Zealand, but also globally, is renowned for being unreliable and frequently nonexistent. Ground-based network solutions like cellular and point-to-point networks have limited range, where their signals only travel a few dozens of kilometers. But then satellite has been really expensive, until now. Swarm created the world’s tiniest satellites in orbit which you can purchase a small compact low-power tile to collect data from any sensor.

    "There are so many wonderful companies in New Zealand doing agriculture and IoT. New Zealand is the one country that we have sold the most devices so far. There is a huge interest because you are forward-thinking towards innovation and technology," Sara Spangelo, Swarm

    By deploying internet-connected sensors and robotics into the field data can be continuously collected to monitor crop and soil health, detect pests, and automate tasks like irrigation, fertilizing, and harvesting.

    Growers can now make data-informed decisions about production to optimize for profitability and market-driven volume. These technologies also significantly reduce the waste of precious resources like water.

    Dr. Sara Spangelo worked on small satellites and autonomous aircraft at the University of Michigan and was a lead systems engineer at both NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) and Google X. She holds a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Michigan and in 2017 was a Top 32 Canadian astronaut candidate.

    For more information on how Swarm is being used in agriculture, visit https://swarm.space/applications/agriculture

  • This is the one episode in nearly 900 episodes where I teared up editing it!

    Meet one of my great mates, Anna. As an open-minded, intelligent, technologically advanced sheep & beef farmer in her 30's she is trumped, not at why change is needed, but how.

    Anna Fisher, a passionate farming mother of 2-under-5 gives an authentic insight into life on farm navigating the rise in demands from every level and why farmers took to the streets in protest.

    "Most of our friends in the farming industry are pretty upbeat sort of people. You don't ever see them angry or down and out but now they are saying, geez, I've had enough. There are just so many pressures on farming, you feel like a minority that people just hate you," explains Anna.

  • Want to understand the proposed changes to the freshwater farm plan and intensive winter grazing rules? Are these changes more workable for land-owners, how will improvements be measured and audited, what on-farm tools will be used?

    Bryan Smith, Chief Advisor for Freshwater from the Ministry for the Environment presented as part of this Livestream Q & A on Sarah's Country about the proposed changes to the freshwater regulations on Wednesday 22nd September 2021, prior to submissions closing on 7th October 2021.

    The panel featured Sam McIvor (CEO - Beef + Lamb NZ), Sam Lucas (Head of Agronomy at Farmlands), and Kate Scott (Director - Landpro) to dive into if the new changes.

    Watch the show on Sarah's Country on YouTube.

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

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  • Sarah is super excited about the future of wool after this episode - it is truly wool reimagined!

    New Zealand scientists at the Wool Research Insitute (WRONZ) have been exploring new uses for strong wool - nature's miracle fibre that is costing farmers to shear for animal health reasons.

    The game-changing development is the patented technology to break down the fibre into unique particles, powders and pigments with global export potential for applications as diverse as cosmetics, printing, luxury goods, and personal care.

    "One of the massive advantages is by taking wool down to a particle level, we can create a particle that frankly feels fantastic against your skin, still has moisture absorption capability and still takes colour really well. We've attempted to maximise the strengths and the unique properties of wool whilst getting rid of maybe some of the things that have made it a challenge and in modern markets,"explains Tom Hooper, Wool Source.

    This week's Change Maker is the CEO of the newly formed Wool Source, Tom Hooper who will lead the WRONZ initiative with the goal of the three-year programme aims to prove the commercial viability of the new deconstructed wool particle products.

    For more information on the show, visit www.sarahscountry.com

    Subscribe to Sarah’s Country on the podcast and if you love us, please leave a review!

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

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