Afleveringen

  • Famed as one of Rome’s fiercest enemies, the city of Carthage was one of the jewels of the ancient Mediterranean world. Situated on the coast of North Africa on the tip of what is now Tunisia, it first rose to prominence as a Phoenician colony. But how did this once fledgling outpost rise to claim it’s ancient pre-eminence? 


    In this episode of the Ancients, Tristan Hughes is once again joined by Dr. Eve MacDonald to explore the origins of this most famous of ancient cities and tell the story of how Princess Dido of Tyre journeyed across the seas to found the future home of Hannibal, bane of Rome.


    This episode was produced by Elena Guthrie and Joseph Knight and edited by Aidan Lonergan. Scriptwriter: Andrew Hulse 


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  • Over 45,000 years ago, Ice Age Britain was undergoing a transformation. 


    The first modern humans, Homo sapiens, were arriving and beginning to settle in the British Isles. Their evolutionary predecessors, the Neanderthals, were on their way to extinction. Until now we have known very little about this period. But that might be about to change with the discovery of a new centre of Stone Age archeology in South West Wales.


    Wogan Cavern, situated underneath Pembroke Castle, was the ideal place for newly-arrived prehistoric hunter-gatherer communities to dwell and is littered with stone tools, bones and other hallmark remains of ancient human settlement. In this special on-location episode of The Ancients, Tristan Hughes went to visit the cavern and speak to the archeologists who uncovered it, Dr. Rob Dinnis and Dr. Jennifer French. 


    This episode was produced by Joseph Knight and edited by Aidan Lonergan


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  • Lucius Cornellius Sulla Felix is one of the most important Roman statesmen of antiquity. An inspiration to figures such as Julius Caesar, Sulla rose to prominence during the late second and early first centuries BC, and was a military man turned dictator after his brutal victory over Marius and Cinna at the Battle of the Colline Gate.


    Today, Tristan is joined by Dr Alex Petkas to discuss what the sources say about Sulla, how he rose to power, and what we know of his role in the downfall of the Roman Republic.


    This episode was edited by Joseph Knight. Senior producer was Elena Guthrie.


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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  • The Sasanians are renowned as one of Rome's most feared enemies. Founded in third century Persia by an Iranian noble called Ardashir, their dynasty oversaw the growth of a mighty empire that brought down the Parthians and survived into the early Middle Ages. But how did one family oversee the rebirth of Persia as a Mesopotamian heavyweight?


    In this episode of the Ancients, Tristan Hughes is joined by Dr Eve MacDonald to explore how the Sassanids came to dominate a region that had been under the control of Parthian kings for five hundred years, and discover why they dared to challenge the might of Rome.


    This episode was produced by Joseph Knight and edited by Aidan Lonergan


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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  • The Epic of Gilgamesh is one of the oldest surviving works of storytelling in history. It begins with the tale of Gilgamesh’s friendship with the wild man Enkidu. But after Enkidu is killed, King Gilgamesh embarks on a journey into his distant past in search for immortality. 


    In this episode of the Ancients, the second part of our series on the Epic of Gilgamesh, Dr Sophus Helle returns to speak to Tristan Hughes about Gilgamesh’s quest and his encounters with a mysterious sage called Ut-napishtim - who some claim may have been the inspiration behind the biblical figure of Noah & his famous Ark.


    The first part of our Gilgamesh series, The Epic of Gilgamesh: Rise of Enkidu can be found here


    This episode was produced by Joseph Knight and edited by Aidan Lonergan


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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  • The Epic of Gilgamesh is one of the oldest surviving works of storytelling from history. Written in ancient Mesopotamia over three thousand years ago, this epic poem recounts the fabled tale of King Gilgamesh of Uruk and the forging of his friendship with Enkidu, a wild man sent by the Gods to keep Gilgamesh on the right path.


    In this episode of the Ancients, Tristan Hughes is joined by Dr Sophus Helle to explore and recount this oldest of myths - first written in Old Babylonian on cuneiform tablets - and discover how it became a foundational work in the tradition of heroic sagas. 


    This episode was edited by Aidan Lonergan and produced by Joseph Knight


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  • For millennia dogs have been undoubtedly man’s best friend. But when did humans first start keeping dogs as pets? The fascinating story of how ancient hunter gatherers first domesticated our now beloved canines is the subject of today’s episode and takes us right back into the depths of the Ice Age.


    Tristan is joined in this episode by archeologist Dr Angela Perri to chat about how the wild wolf packs that roamed the icy wastes of the ancient world gradually became the four pawed friends we know and love today.


    This episode was edited by Aidan Lonergan and produced by Annie Coloe and Joseph Knight


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  • Famed as the herald of the Greek gods, Hermes is the ‘jack of all trades’ when it comes to the pantheon of Mount Olympus. Known for his trademark winged sandals and snake encircled sceptre, he is the god of both thieves and shepherds. But how did he earn those titles?


    In this episode of the Ancients, Tristan Hughes continues our Gods and Goddesses series with Christopher Bungard to chat all things Hermes   and answer the most important of questions - how did his sandals grow wings? 


    Senior Producer: Elena Guthrie. Assistant Producer: Joseph Knight. Editor: Aidan Lonergan. Script Writer: Andrew Hulse. Voice Actor: Lucy Davidson


    Other episodes in this series include: Zeus, Hera, Hephaestus, Aphrodite, Ares, Athena, King Midas, Achilles, Poseidon, Medusa, Hades, Persephone, and Demeter.


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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  • This is everything you need to know about the famed conqueror Alexander the Great. Alongside Dan Snow, host of Dan Snow's History Hit, Tristan and Dan follow Alexander on a whistle-stop tour from his life in Macedonia to his epic battles with the Persians and eventually, to his death in Babylon.


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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  • Lascaux Cave is an Ice Age wonder. Its walls and ceilings are adorned with stunning depictions of bison, aurochs and deer painted by hunter-gatherers 20,000 years ago using all kinds of pigments from red ochre to violet. They are, quite simply some of the most beautiful examples of Palaeolithic artwork ever discovered.


    In this episode of The Ancients, Tristan Hughes is joined by Prof. Paul Pettitt to delve into the wonders of Lascaux Cave. Together they explore how supposedly primitive hunter gatherers were capable of drawing such beautiful artwork and reflect on what it means for how we view Palaeolithic hunter gatherer societies today. 


    This episode edited by Aidan Lonergan and produced by Joseph Knight and Annie Coloe.


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.

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  • Marcus Tullius Cicero is one of the most famous orators in ancient history, and a central figure during the final years of the Roman Republic.


    To explore his life and career, Tristan is joined by Dr Henriette van der Blom from the University of Birmingham. Together they explore Cicero's rise to power, how his speeches shaped public opinion, his relationships with the likes of Julius Caesar, and of course, how he exposed the Catiline Conspiracy.


    This episode was produced by Elena Guthrie and Annie Coloe, and edited by Joseph Knight.


    If you enjoyed this episode, you might also like our episodes on The Rise of Cicero and Cicero's Fight for the Roman Republic.


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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  • The Bronze Age Collapse was one of the most cataclysmic events in human history. Over just a few decades, civilisations across the Mediterranean from Greece and Egypt to Mesopotamia and Babylon abruptly deteriorated, bringing an end to one epoch and birthing another. But what exactly happened? And what caused these powerful and interconnected civilisations to come crashing down simultaneously? 


    In today’s episode of the Ancients, Tristan Hughes speaks to Eric Cline to explore the origins of the crisis which birthed the Iron Age and examine the role played by invasions, drought and famine in causing it.


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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  • Over 10,000 years ago, many believe Ireland was a place where hunter-gatherers roamed. A place where the earliest human communities exchanged prizes of the hunt and crafted primitive tools to aid their survival. But what if their interactions with each other were more sophisticated? What if hunter-gatherer is a misnomer?


    In the episode of the Ancients, Tristan Hughes speaks to Professor Graeme Warren about Ireland's rich prehistoric archaeology to discover how the earliest communities lived their lives. What do we know about these first people who made the island of Ireland their home?


    They also discuss how the remnants of Ireland’s distant Mesolithic past shed light on the shared practices between Ireland and other parts of Mesolithic Europe and how the Irish Sea played a significant role in the exchange of culture between those regions.


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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  • The ancient city of Jericho is often thought to be the oldest continuously inhabited settlement in the world. Made famous by the biblical tale of its conquest by Joshua, it is situated a stones throw from the western bank of the Jordan River. But did Jericho’s famous walls really come crashing down at the sound of Joshua’s trumpets?


    In this episode of The Ancients, Tristan speaks to archeologist Felicity Cobbing from the Palestine Exploration Fund to explore what Jericho’s archeology can reveal about its past. In doing so they catch glimpses of the city's extraordinary evolution and the pivotal role it played in shaping the cultural, agricultural and defensive processes of other ancient civilisations.


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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  • This episode contains a reference to animal cruelty


    Would you be able to survive in ancient Rome?


    Today, Tristan Hughes is joined by Ben Kane to discusses the realities of daily life in the Roman Empire. Together, they discuss everything from street life and chamber pots through to pick pockets and slavery. Spoiler alert: it was quite smelly and dangerous.


    If you enjoyed this episode, Ben Kane also joined us for an episode on The Roman Legionary.


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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  • Zeus, the chief deity in Greek mythology, is the Olympian god of sky and thunder, and is king of all other gods and men.


    His tale is one of overthrowing fathers, eating babies and seducing women, both mortal and divine, by changing his own form. He's one of the most complex figures in history, and his story is one that's been retold throughout millennia. To try and make sense of it all, we're going back to very beginning, to the origins of Zeus, starting with his grandfather and grandmother, Uranus and Gaia. We learn about the prophecy that ultimately overthrows Uranus, the same one that is also fated for Zeus's father, Cronus, and start to understand the family-tree that becomes the Olympians - from Athena to Dionysus.


    For this episode, Tristan Hughes is joined by academic, author, broadcaster and Professor in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Warwick, Michael Scott. If you enjoyed this episode, you might also enjoy The Symposium: How To Party Like An Ancient Greek, also with Michael Scott.


    Script written by Andrew Hulse

    Voice over performed by Deryn Oliver

    Produced, edited and sound designed by Elena Guthrie

    The Assistant Producer was Annie Coloe


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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    First published November 2022

  • March 15th 44BC is perhaps the most notorious date in all of ancient history. On that fateful day, the Ides of March, 55-year-old Roman dictator Gaius Julius Caesar was assassinated by a group of disaffected senators.


    In this episode, Tristan (with a little help from Dr Emma Southon and Dr Steele Brand) untangles fact from fiction, truth from myth, to take you back to that very afternoon in the heart of Rome's doomed republic.


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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    First published March 2022

  • He was one of the greatest enemies the Romans ever faced. An excellent general and a larger-than-life figure, he led an army across the alps and dealt a series of crushing defeats upon the Romans on Italian soil. His achievements have become a thing of legend and his name has become immortalised. He was Hannibal Barca. Hannibal rests amongst antiquity's greatest generals, but how did he rise to become such a stellar commander, leading his men to incredible victories against the then dominant powerhouse in the Mediterranean?


    In this episode, Dr Louis Rawlings, Dr Adrian Goldsworthy and Dr Eve MacDonald explore the impressive ascent of the Carthaginian general to the status of one of the most famous military leaders in antiquity.


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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    First published August 2021

  • This episode contains graphic references to sex, infant mortality, and sexual assault.


    While Spartans are often thought of for their bloodthirsty and fear inspiring performance on the battlefield - their sex lives and relationships have also been immortalised in history. From the Spartan King Menelaus and his infamous wife Helen of Troy, through to adolescent same-sex relationships - Sparta truly had it all. But what do we actually know about sex in Sparta, and how true are the ancient sources?


    In the final episode of our Sparta mini-series, Tristan welcomes back Professor Paul Cartledge to look at what sex in Sparta was actually like. From tackling infertility in the ancient world, through to what Spartan courtship would've been like - was it possible to have Romanced a Spartan Warrior?


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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  • Marked by shifting alliances, chaotic power struggles, and devastating consequences - the Peloponnesian War was a conflict for the ages. Fought between Athens and Sparta, along with their begrudging allies, the conflict changed the course of Ancient History as we know it. Lasting for nearly three decades, it ultimately ended Athenian supremacy - and ushered in an age of Spartan Hegemony on the mainland. But what caused such a devastating conflict to happen, and could it have been avoided?


    In the third episode of our Sparta series, Tristan welcomes back Owen Reese to give us a whistle stop tour through this gigantic ancient conflict. Looking at the causes, key players, and the consequences - what caused these great city states to go to war? And what do the sources actually tell us about what happened?


    Discover the past with exclusive history documentaries and ad-free podcasts presented by world-renowned historians from History Hit. Watch them on your smart TV or on the go with your mobile device. Get 50% off your first 3 months with code ANCIENTS sign up now for your 14-day free trial HERE.


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