Afleveringen

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's the possible move for Ports of Auckland, and how it could impact the whole country. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    New Zealand is a country that relies on its trade relationships in order to keep a good standard of living, and a lot of those imports and exports come through the ports.

    That’s why a debate over Auckland’s port has grown so heated, as some say it should be moved to Northland.

    The situation came to a head with a leak of documents to the Herald’s own Simon Wilson this week.

    The report showed the cost of leaving the port where it is to be about $8 billion.

    But moving it will cost about $10 billion.

    Add to that the complex social impacts, with transport infrastructure needing to change to support either decision, and jobs on the line in Auckland, Northland, and the wider country.

    For the latest Front Page podcast I talked to Simon Wilson about what the leak means, how this debate became so tense and fractured, and if there are any hints on what the Government will decide.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's the proposed changes to fix the homes we live in. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    Rental property law is a bone of contention currently, with proposed changes to how the system works.

    It could have a huge impact on people's lives, as there’s about 600,000 rental homes in New Zealand, and 1.5 million of us live in them.

    The Government has announced a raft of possible changes, which if passed would be the biggest changes to tenancy laws since 1986.

    Landlords are nervous, and particularly pushing back on the idea of scrapping "no-cause terminations" - the ability to tell tenants they need to leave without giving a reason.

    But it's not just rentals, there is also problems with our housing stock more generally. The latest Stats NZ data shows mould is a problem in more than a third of NZ homes.

    It is more prevalent in rental homes than owner-occupied.

    For the latest Front Page podcast I talked to Herald journalists Anne Gibson and Ben Leahy.

    We discussed what the debated changes would mean for New Zealanders, if the tenancy tribunal needs more teeth, and how to make sure housing isn't hurting our health.

    For the interviews, listen to the podcast.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

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  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's what we can all do to help those in mental distress. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    It’s no secret that New Zealand has a mental health problem, but many of us can feel paralysed if a friend tells us they’re having trouble.

    Especially if we're not entirely sure what they're going through; while many of us have heard of depression, there's much less talk about what it's like when you're dealing with OCD, or psychosis.

    So journalist Juliette Sivertsen decided to find out what it's like for people going through different types of challenges, and the support that actually helped them in their dark moments.

    She talked to people who have gone through mental distress, and their support people, for the new podcast Just Listen.

    Juliette came on the Front Page podcast to talk about why the series was important, anything that surprised her while working on it, and the duty of care journalists have when working on such subjects.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's why the SkyCity fire raged so far out of control, and what to expect next. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    More than 100,000 New Zealand student loan borrowers are living overseas, and some now say they feel trapped there, unable to even come home for funerals.

    Hundreds have made the decision to declare bankruptcy, while others have taken the risk of coming home, and been arrested at the airport.

    Others have stayed in New Zealand, but put off having children or buying a home, saying they simply can't afford it.

    The Herald's Simon Collins looked into the problem for the Generation Debt series, and took us behind the scenes for the latest Front Page podcast.

    Read more of his series here:
    Generation Debt: Ex-Kiwi student loan borrowers scared to come home https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12268861
    Generation Debt: Student loan for life was 'well worth it' https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12267976
    Generation Debt: How student loans have defined a generation https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12265965

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's why the SkyCity fire raged so far out of control, and what to expect next. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    A shocking blaze at the $700m SkyCity convention centre has brought Auckland to a standstill, with 150 firefighters battling the fire at its peak.

    As the fire raged, smoke filled the central business district, with many reporting sore throats, burning eyes, and coughing.

    The fire is now under control, but firefighters say they expect to be at the site for days, dampening down hotspots.

    How on earth could this fire rage out of control in modern times, and how bad will this be for our economy?

    To answer common questions the newsroom was sent during the fire, Anna Leask and Anne Gibson came on The Front Page podcast.

    We discussed what made the fire so challening to put out, whether there were problems with the building construction, and how far into the millions the damage could go.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's the escalating problems in housing, and how it impacts us all. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    A new investigation is sounding a warning that thousands more New Zealanders are in danger of homelessness, with demand for state housing far outstripping the rate at which it's being built.

    Some commentators are warning that people living in caravan parks and motels becomes our new normal.

    It particularly spells trouble for working parents, and those about to hit retirement.

    But it impacts everyone, with the wider housing issue leaving New Zealand with the highest house prices relative to income in the OECD.

    The past 30 years has seen falling home-ownership rates, a lack of new rentals, and rising rents.

    It's this wider trend which has priced working families out of private rentals, and into state housing, or homelessness.

    For the latest Front Page I spoke with investigative journalist Kirsty Johnston about what she uncovered, and the small number of solutions available.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's miniscule numbers of people voting in local elections, and what needs to change. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    Local body elections are closing this weekend, but are already marred by plummeting voter turnout in many areas.

    At the last available count, 22.6 per cent of Auckland's voters have had a say.

    Meanwhile in Wellington, as of Wednesday, only 25.4 per cent have cast a vote.

    Some, even the Prime Minister herself, are suggesting this means it's time to change.

    Jacinda Ardern has stated she wants online voting to be an option in the 2022 local elections.

    But do we blame lazy voters, uninspiring council candidates, or the system itself?

    Herald super city reporter Bernard Orsman and Herald Wellington issues reporter Georgina Campbell joined me on the latest Front Page podcast.

    We talked about what they've seen going wrong, whether online voting will fix it, and who's really to blame.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's the changing nature of trade, and how it impacts New Zealand. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    The world trade environment has profoundly changed over the past few years, as world superpowers the United States and United Kingdom both retreat into protectionism.

    It's not just about money, but relationships, as Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern showed when she started a trade agreement to fight climate change.

    Ardern announced the launch of negotiations for the Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability (ACCTS) at the United Nations in New York last week.

    The agreement includes goals like removing tariffs on environmental products, but so far only five countries have signed up.

    Meanwhile the World Trade Organisation has cut its forecast for trade growth by more than half, and issued a warning that living standards and jobs could take a hit.

    Back in New Zealand, the September ANZ Business Outlook Survey shows business confidence falling once again.

    So as the US and UK take a step back from the world stage, does it mean lean times for the rest of us, or will something or someone else fill the vacuum?

    Herald business editor at large Liam Dann came on the Front Page podcast to discuss these issues, and where it leaves New Zealand.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • The protests in Hong Kong have now been going for more than 100 days, and it seems neither side is willing to give up.

    It started with plans to allow extraditions to mainland China, but has now grown into a wider movement questioning the entire relationship between Hong Kong and the mainland.

    Herald reporter Keith Ng has been on the ground in Hong Kong, and joined me on the Front Page to talk about the levels of anger in Hong Kong, what's at stake, and why NZ needs to be careful not to become a pawn.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's the Covering Climate Now campaign, and the groundswell of urgency. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    Climate change is an issue that's being treated with increasing urgency, as voters take up the cause, and politicians take notice.

    Data from the Pew Research Centre shows that internationally, 67 per cent of us see climate change as a major threat to our country.

    That number is from the median of respondents in 23 countries in 2018. It's a jump up from 56 per cent in 2013.

    But the issue has been bubbling away for decades.

    The first report on climate change by a New Zealand government was commissioned in 1988, a year when David Lange was Labour Prime Minister, the first Die Hard movie was in cinemas and All Black Ryan Crotty was born.

    So why are people suddenly wanting change now? And, is all of this awareness and urgency just too little, too late?

    For the latest Front Page podcast I talked to Herald science reporter Jamie Morton.

    We discussed the best and worst case scenarios, why it's taken so long to act, and what the average person can do to make an impact.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's the troubling details of foreign political donations. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    Serious questions are being raised about political donations and whether they're leaving us open to foreign interference.

    A Herald investigation has found former trade minister Todd McClay helped arrange a $150,000 donation from Chinese racing industry billionaire Lin Lang, begging the question of what was expected in return.

    The donation was made through a New Zealand-registered company after chairman and owner Lin Lang met then trade-minister Todd McClay in Beijing and Rotorua.

    The revelations a Minister was involved in facilitating National's largest donation of the most recent electoral cycle - with the cash coming from a foreign-owned business - comes as Parliament mulls how to counter foreign interference in New Zealand's political system.

    The justice select committee is currently deliberating on reforming the country's electoral finance laws, having heard from NZSIS director Rebecca Kitteridge in a rare briefing, saying foreign donations are a vector of concern.

    For the latest Front Page podcast I talked to the journalist who uncovered the story, investigative journalist Matt Nippert.

    We discussed why the donation raised eyebrows, what the SIS are concerned about, and if change to our donations system is likely.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's where to draw the line when holding politicians to account. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    Australian radio host Alan Jones practically caused a trans-Tasman diplomatic incident after saying on air that our Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern needed a sock shoved "down her throat", and that Aussie PM Scott Morrison should give her "a few backhanders".

    It's led to widespread backlash, and big name advertisers leaving his show in droves.

    But Jacinda Ardern isn't just anyone, she's the Prime Minister, and leads a country, so where does strong criticism cross the line?

    For this week's Front Page podcast I talked to NZ Herald editor Murray Kirkness, and political reporter Jason Walls.

    We discussed what sparked the comments from Jones, the political reaction, and where reporters draw the line when covering such stories.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's the worrying financials of Fonterra, and what it means for our farmers. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    Fonterra's numbers aren't looking good, with the dairy giant saying it expects a full-year loss of $675 million.

    It's the second annual loss in a row, and comes when Federated Farmers surveys already show farmers are the most pessimistic they've been in a decade.

    The co-op says it won't pay a dividend for the year to July 31 so that it can pay off debt.

    The one silver lining is that it seems farmer will still get paid for their milk.

    Fonterra says its $6.30-$6.40 per kg milk price for the 2018/19 season will remain in place, as will the current forecast for 2019/20 of $6.25 to $7.25 kg.

    But that doesn't mean it's plain sailing, as the lack of dividend will bite, and Fonterra still needs to prove it's correcting course.

    For the latest Front Page podcast I talked to Herald business journalist Jamie Gray about where these problems came from, if farmers should worry, and how much blame former CEO Theo Spierings should get.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's the increasing numbers of highly wealthy people, and the problem of how to tax them. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    The number of super-rich in New Zealand has increased by 75 per cent in the past five years.

    That means 350 people here are worth more than $50 million.

    But with these very rich people comes problems with how we make sure everyone pays their fair share of tax.

    Some of those individuals are currently in disputes with the IRD over more than $85 million in potential tax.

    It can be a nightmare to solve, with complex trusts, international income streams, and highly powered lawyers and accountants ready to protect it.

    For the latest Front Page podcast, I talked to investigative reporter Matt Nippert and business editor at large Liam Dann.

    We discussed why there has been a boom in wealth, if the IRD is outgunned, and how the big multinational companies add an extra layer of tax complication.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

    Read more on the Herald investigation into the super-rich and tax, here https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12252697

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's how a lack of money is causing serious health problems. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    Major problems are bubbling up in our health system, and the root cause always seems to come back to a lack of resources and money.

    We've seen it within the last week, where a series of Herald investigations uncovered serious issues with maternal healthcare, and vaccination rates of our children.

    A watchdog found women with a life-threatening condition weren't treated properly because of a lack of hospital staff.

    The investigations point to capacity problems extending beyond maternity services at Counties Manukau DHB, where problems like a lack of staff contributed to the recent death or stillbirth of three babies.

    Apex Union has also warned life-saving diagnoses of conditions like cancer could be delayed for South Aucklanders because of a workforce crisis.

    Meanwhile vaccination rates are dropping across the country as fewer families immunise their babies.

    But while the debate has been centred around the impact of the anti-vaxx movement, the numbers paint a different picture.

    Data shows the plummeting vaccination rates are being driven largely by the failure to immunise babies born into poor or Māori families - not by parents deliberately opting out.

    Herald investigative journalists Nick Jones and Kirsty Johnston came on the Front Page podcast to talk about what's happening, and if there's any political appetite to fix it.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

    You can read more about their investigations here:
    Sepsis warning for pregnant women: Hospital staffing 'inadequate', watchdog finds https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12251014

    Counties Manukau DHB rejects 'alarmist' claims about possible X-ray and CT scan delays https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12252300

    PM Jacinda Ardern on strained Middlemore maternity services: 'consistent underfunding' https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12251667

    Anti-vaxx debate: Vaccination rates plummet for NZ babies https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12250703

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's the disturbing stories coming out about Oranga Tamariki. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    Four inquiries are under way into Oranga Tamariki, the organisation that is supposed to keep vulnerable children safe from harm.

    There was video of a highly distressing baby uplift, and since then, plenty of other worrying stories have come out of the woodwork.

    Over the weekend, Māori from across the country packed out an Auckland hui for the launch of one of the inquiries into Oranga Tamariki.

    Organisers said being Māori-led would make it easier for some participants who had been dealing with Oranga Tamariki their entire lives to open up.

    Meanwhile a Herald investigation uncovered another failing, after a judge strongly criticised Oranga Tamariki for planning to send the child of a drug-trafficking mother back to the country of his birth, despite evidence criminal gangs might sell him to cover his parent's debts.

    To get to the bottom of what's going wrong, and what's being suggested to fix it, on the latest Front Page podcast I talk to Newstalk ZB's Jake McKee and Herald investigative journalist David Fisher.

    For more on David Fisher's investigation, click here https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12248199

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's the government changes aimed at getting you into a greener car. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    This podcast was first available a week earlier, to Herald Premium subscribers.

    The Government is making green cars cheaper, and the big polluters more expensive.

    It's only for newly imported vehicles, and aims to make it an easier choice for people to pick lower emission cars.

    But New Zealand is a geographically big country, with a small number of people trying to get from A to B.

    For years, we've relied on cars to get us there.

    Besides, if cars are switched over to electric, is that enough to solve climate change? There will still be congestion, petrol taxes needed to pay for our roads, and what about other forms of transport like flying?

    It's a complicated issue, but our journalists have dived into it. There are already changes under way in other transport areas apart from cars, and it looks like the Labour-led Government also has a few more cards to play.

    I talked to Herald political journalist Jason Walls and energy writer Grant Bradley for the latest Front Page.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's the plastic bag ban, and what really needs to happen to protect our environment. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    Single use plastic bags are now banned, as the Government tries to crack down on pointless waste in our lives.

    It's surely one of the smaller changes we'll need to make as climate change looms, but still the fury from some about losing their plastic bags has been intense.

    The rules apply to any type of plastic less than 70 microns in thickness, that's new or un-used, has carry handles, is provided for carrying sold goods, and is made of bio-based materials like starch.

    The law also covers bags made of plastics that are degradable, biodegradable or oxo-degradable.

    It comes as the Government also spends $40 million from its Provincial Growth Fund on crowd-sourcing ideas to reduce the amount of plastic waste in New Zealand.

    So is this pointless symbolism, or the first step of many needed to change the unsustainable way we're living?

    For the latest Front Page podcast I talked to Herald science reporter Jamie Morton about what the ban impacts, the science behind it, and what conservationists say needs to happen next.

    I also talked to Herald lifestyle reporter Rebecca Blithe, who is attempting to go plastic-free, about how that works in the realities of modern life.

    If you want to know how Rebecca's challenge goes, keep an eye out for the final results in the July 15 edition of Be Well, in the Herald and online.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's how ANZ got into trouble, and how worried we should be about it. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    ANZ is in hot water lately, with its CEO departing under a cloud.

    There are questions over how much he enjoyed perks he wasn't entitled to, like filing expenses for wine storage and travel, as well as a strange house sale.

    There are also issues around whether the bank was operating properly, with the Reserve Bank pulling ANZ's accreditation to run its own operational risk capital requirements back in May.

    It comes at a time of low trust for the banking sector generally, with a Royal Commission finding disturbing things in Australia.

    There has been a conduct and culture review here in NZ, but some are now calling for our own Royal Commission.

    Herald business editor at large Liam Dann has been keeping a watchful eye on the saga, and came on the Front Page podcast to unravel the confusion.

    We discussed how the controversy could change the banking sector, whether there's a crisis of public confidence, and whether more heads will roll.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook

  • Each week The Front Page takes you behind the scenes of the biggest story from the New Zealand Herald and Newstalk ZB. Today it's the mood for change in transport, and whether it will actually happen. Hosted by Frances Cook.

    Emotions run hot over traffic in this country, and it's no wonder when you see how frustrating our transport systems can be.

    Well the debate is now wide open again, as the Government gave $1 billion for rail in the latest budget.

    KiwiRail will get the funding over two years, with $375 million for new wagons and locomotives, and $331m earmarked for buying new tracks and supporting other infrastructure.

    On the other hand, the NZTA is debating lowering speed limits for our dangerous roads.

    The Agency estimates about 87 per cent of speed limits in New Zealand are too high for the conditions.

    For the latest Front Page podcast I talked to Herald senior writer Simon Wilson about where this debate is headed.

    We discussed whether there's a "war on cars", whether the funding boost for rail will be enough, and whether we're giving enough thought to alternative modes of transport.

    If you have questions about Herald investigations, or want to stay up to date on social media, you can find host Frances Cook on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/FrancesCookJournalist/ Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/francescooknz/ and Twitter here https://twitter.com/FrancesCook