Afleveringen

  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Chris McCoy 🇺🇸! He's a pastor who did odd jobs on the side. But he was always interested in coding! Somewhere between working retail and doing food delivery, he realized he needed something more stimulating. Nine months later, he landed not one but two job offers as a junior developer!

    Chris CRUSHED it on LinkedIn, even though he never liked social media: in this episode, he shares his approach to posting and being actively present on the platform. You can use it both to learn and to connect with people working in the industry, and that's exactly what Chris did. Spoiler alert: it doesn't have to be complicated.

    You'll also learn more about internships: Chris landed one, which turned out to be pretty cool! What do companies look for in an intern? Should you become one, and how? He also shares how he approached learning to code and found a balance between learning and work. Chris and Alex also discuss what you can learn from odd jobs.

    Sadly, you won't learn the recipe for Chick-fil-A. But it does make an appearance in this episode :)

    🔗 Connect with Chris

    👨🏼‍💼 Linkedin

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Chris decided to become a developer (01:51)Can you still learn something from odd jobs that have nothing to do with coding? (03:19)How Chris chose to learn to code and found support in his community (04:35)Balancing work, learning, and being a pastor: how Chris did it (06:28)How Chris discovered Scrimba (09:16)It's okay not to know everything about development (12:08)Why you need real-world examples when learning a new skill (12:57)Did Chris complete Scrimba's Career Path or get a job before he managed to? (14:14)When and how did Chris start applying for jobs? (16:31)How Chris created a LinkedIn profile and started crushing it (17:31)How to be genuinely present on LinkedIn and use the platform to connect (18:33)Chris's approach to writing LinkedIn posts (21:36)How adding Scrimba to his education connected Chris to a recruiter (21:51)Can an internship be... good? (24:41)What does a company expect from an intern, and what did Chris do about it (27:05)Working with other interns and the higher-ups (30:02)How Chris compared to the other interns in his group (32:38)How Chris's internship turned into a job (34:33)In the end, Chris had not one but two job offers! How did he pick one? (36:17)The hard work paid off (37:49)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    The Frontend Developer Career Path

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Quincy Larson 🇺🇸! Quincy is the founder of freeCodeCamp, a nonprofit company that makes coding accessible for all. He is a self-taught developer who learned to code when he was 31. Why did he learn to code? Because he wanted to make a school he was a director of more efficient. So... We have a career changer!

    So, how does a teacher teach himself to code? And how does he teach others? In this episode, Alex asks hard questions, and Quincy answers all of them, sharing valuable insights on how adults learn, how important are your intrinsic capabilities, and why learning a new skill after the age of 25 might be easier than you think. You will also learn about the hacker ethic, how you can overcome your limitations, and why software developers need to be humble.

    🔗 Connect with Quincy

    👨🏼‍💼 Linkedin🐦 Twitter

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Quincy Larson started coding at the age of 31... as a school director (01:55)Why you should hang out with other developers (03:52)What is the hacker ethic? (04:51)Why do software developers need to be humble? (07:07)Quincy learning to code before freeCodeCamp. What was that like? (08:16)How does a teacher learn? (11:09)The key learning technique for people over 25 (11:56)The elusive nature of learning to code (15:41)How does an adult brain learn, and why might kinesthetic learning be the best way? (17:29)Can an old dog learn new tricks? (18:57)Learning with analogies and associations + why you shouldn't drink (21:47)Quincy is a master learner... But what if you're not? (24:49)Can anyone learn to code and become a successful developer? (27:35)Are aptitudes important? (28:24)Overcoming your limitations (32:16)How does Quincy feel about the success of freeCodeCamp? (34:44)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    freeCodeCampHackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution, book by Steven Levy

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Stevie Gill 🇬🇧! Stevie was a scientist, a medical writer and an editor, and then he wrote about video games. Eventually, he moved countries and changed careers. Nowadays, Stevie lives in Toronto, Canada, and works as a full-time front-end developer at Kijiji. In this episode, he shares his story and everything he learned along the way that can help you land your first developer job!

    You'll hear how Stevie learned to code, how he prepared for the interviews, and that LinkedIn can be useful even if you only have a handful of connections. He reveals how he took a generic portfolio project and made it his own - and why you should do the same. Stevie and Alex discuss Stevie's interview process in depth (be warned: there are some witty HR people out there) and also answer the question of whether you should be dreading the gaps on your resume.

    🔗 Connect with Stevie

    👨🏼‍💼 Linkedin🐦 Twitter🌐 Blog🌐 Portfolio👩‍🚀 GitHub

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Stevie's journey into coding (02:01)How moving countries helped Stevie switch careers... and discover Scrimba in the process (05:27)Is LinkedIn that important, and how can you stack the deck in your favor (07:56)A hiring manager discovered Stevie's LinkedIn. How? (13:40)Can you have seven years of React experience and still be a junior? (15:39)Are there any hidden perks of generic messages from recruiters? (16:44)What do recruiters want to know when they're getting to know you as a candidate? (18:40)Taylor Desseyn on how to spot a good recruiter on LinkedIn (19:48)How to deal with a gap on your resume when you're changing careers (20:51)How to stand out from other job candidates (23:14)Stevie's four job interviews: deep dive (24:19)Fun HR questions in a soft skills interview: how to answer them and why are they there (24:30)How to prepare for a tech interview + how Stevie impressed an interviewer (27:59)Stevie's final interview, and how he made an app that became a major talking point (33:56)How to make a fun portfolio project and impress your interviewers (35:40)Don't do this! (39:02)How Stevie got a job offer... with a drumroll! (39:41)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    FreeCodeCampThe Frontend Developer Career PathStevie's RetroFix appScrimba Podcast: How To Work With Recruiters According to Senior Recruiter Taylor Desseyn

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Tiffany Jachja 🇺🇸! Tiffany is a data scientist, career coach, engineering manager, and Twitch streamer! By day, she works at Vox Media. In her free time, she helps fellow developers by sharing career advice and her computer and data science knowledge. In this episode, Tiffany helps you understand a company's organizational structure so that you can come to your job interview prepared!

    Alex and Tiffany also talk about resumes: what is their function, and is there such a thing as an ideal resume? You'll also learn the main differences between studying computer science and taking a bootcamp, how to approach the job-hunting tips you find online, how to know if you're ready to apply for your first developer job, and why inspiration matters. Tiffany also shares her favorite online coder communities and job boards!

    🔗 Connect with Tiffany

    👩🏻‍💼 Linkedin📹 Twitch🐦 Twitter🌐 Website

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Tiffany got interested in coding thanks to Neopets (02:07)What's the main difference between studying computer science and taking a coding bootcamp? (04:10)The importance of trying stuff out (05:36)What drew Tiffany into management... and data science (08:40)What does Tiffany's typical day at Vox look like? (09:52)Understanding company hierarchy for new developers (10:56)Project management vs. people management (16:00)What should a new developer look for in their engineering manager? (18:37)How does Tiffany choose between a stronger technical fit and a stronger culture fit when hiring? (22:42)Should you meet 100% of the requirements when applying for your first junior role? (27:41)How to build up the confidence needed for career advancement (29:09)How does Tiffany get out of her comfort zone? (32:31)How Tiffany became a career coach (33:26)What should a good resume do? (36:46)Why are resumes so difficult to get right? (37:14)Attaching numbers to your contributions on a resume: how to do it, and why? (40:48)How to approach online advice on job-hunting, so you don't lose your mind (45:38) Tiffany's advice for a new developer entering the job market (46:59)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    Video: From Student to Senior: Career Development 101Danny Thompson's Commit Your Code communityRemoteJobHunters on Reddit

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Silvia Piovesan 🇮🇹! Silvia is a Scrimba student who recently got for job offers after four different interviews. But her success didn't come overnight! Silvia used to be a project manager in the pharmaceutical industry - where she first got interested in coding. After she got laid off (and became a mom!), she wanted to learn to code so that she could become a knowledgeable project manager in IT... before realizing that she actually wanted to code!

    In this episode, Silvia reveals what's the similarities between learning to code and hiking Camino de Santiago, as well as her approach to learning and finding a job as a new developer. You'll find out how to utilize your soft skills, what to do if you don't know the answer to a question on a technical interview, and what to do during your first week on the job. Alex and Silvia also discuss goal setting, and why it's not a good idea to give your 100% every day.

    🔗 Connect with Silvia

    👩🏻‍💼 Linkedin🐦 Twitter🌐 Website👩‍🚀 Github

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Silvia's journey from pharmaceuticals to tech (01:11)How Silvia knew a lot about the inner workings of a company but wanted to pursue specialization (03:27)Did Silvia's professional skills from her previous career help her when she became a developer? (06:06)Silvia's approach to learning to code (09:07)Silvia only learned to code so that she can become a better project manager. What happened next? (10:29)What knowledge did Silvia lack after a bootcamp? How did she discover Scrimba? (14:25)Key takeaways from Silvia's approach (16:41)On setting realistic goals (19:56)How Silvia knew it was time to start applying for jobs and how long it took to get there (21:08)On comparing yourself to other people learning to code (23:39)Did Silvia have doubts about whether or not she would make it? (26:41)Silvia's approach to finding her first developer job (plus: do you need to have a portfolio?) (28:21)Let's talk numbers: how many applications, how many interviews, how many offers? (31:59)How to stand out in a job interview (33:34)Silvia's job interview process (36:10)The most important thing you should know if you're interviewing for jobs (28:52)Where does Silvia work now? (40:49)Silvia's first pull request, and how long does it take to code a button? (42:13)What should you do during your first week on the job? (44:24)

    🧰 Resources mentioned

    Scrimba's Frontend Career PathLearn React for FreeScrimba's Discord communityMock Junior Front End Web Developer Interview with Mike Chen and Silvia

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Jess Chan 🇺🇸! Jess's YouTube channel, Coder Coder, has almost 400,000 subscribers at the time of recording. She's a web developer turned educator, and when she's not teaching her subscribers JavaScript and CSS, she's working on her first course. This episode is about learning, YouTube, and learning on YouTube!

    In this show, you'll learn how to evaluate a course and quickly decide if you can trust a YouTube tutorial. Jess and Alex talk about how YouTube evolved over the years and why it might be an underrated place to meet other developers. You'll hear about Jess's long and meandering road to coding and learn why it's okay if you don't become a full-time developer in just three months. Finally, Jess will reveal, once and for all, what's the best camera for YouTubers.

    🔗 Connect with Jess

    📹 YouTube🐦 Twitter🌐 Website📸 Instagram

    ⏰ Timestamps

    On Coder Coder, and why Jess loves web development (and enjoys teaching it) (01:33)Why you should remember what's it like to be a beginner at something before teaching it (03:33)Can you teach problem-solving on YouTube? (04:55)How Jess went from Pre-Med to photography to becoming a developer and, finally, an educator (06:24)Why it's okay if you don't become a full-time developer in three months (07:51)On becoming a developer in the era before bootcamps (09:33)Can you judge the current state of the industry from YouTube comments? (12:41)How would Jess approach cracking her first coding interview today? (13:22)Why you should look for other people's job interview experiences on YouTube and how the YouTube landscape has changed over the years (14:33)On Jess's YouTube content, the barrier to entry, and the democratization of educational content (16:51)Should new developers make their own YouTube channels? Can you learn soft skills on YouTube? (19:20)Hard skills vs. soft skills - what's more important when it comes to getting your first junior dev job? (21:04)They say you should "be so good they can't ignore you." What does this mean? (22:51)There are a lot of content creators on YouTube. How can you know who to trust? (24:51)Jess's new course on responsive web design, and can you learn without a mentor (30:21)Can you combine resources while learning? (33:25)Quick-fire questions: mechanical keyboards, music for coding, best social networks for developers, and best cameras for YouTube

    🧰 Resources mentioned

    Jessica's YouTube channel: Coder CoderJessica's new responsive web development courseBook: Cracking the Coding Interview

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Theo Ntogiakos 🇬🇧! Theo has just switched careers at the age of 49! Recently, he landed a paid apprenticeship and is currently attending a coding bootcamp. But before that, he learned on Scrimba - he joined a coding challenge in February and became an active member of our community. Although he always did something with computers, he used to think he could never become a front-end developer. Well, he was wrong! And that's why he's here.

    In this episode, Theo shares details about a path that led him here, as well as his approach to learning. You'll find out what's it like to attend a bootcamp and how it compares to Scrimba's learning platform, as well as what kinds of opportunities to keep an eye out for if you're a new developer and live in the UK. Theo also talks about motivation, self-doubt, and whether he could've shifted gears earlier. He and Alex also discuss the importance of wanting to become a developer for the right reasons.

    🔗 Connect with Theo

    👨🏻‍💼 LinkedIn

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Theo's journey into web development (it's a long and winding path!) (01:33)Theo's coding background (it includes Pascal!) (02:48)Why Theo wanted to change careers (05:29)On self-doubt (06:13)Was it challenging to change careers later in life? Plus, the perks of a coding apprenticeship (06:41)How Theo landed a paid apprenticeship after only six months of learning to code... and discovered Scrimba along the way (08:42)Scrimba's coding challenges (11:02)UK developer bootcamps (11:56)How to get an apprenticeship as a web developer in the United Kingdom (14:27)Is salary enough of a reason for a career change? (19:23)What do employers want to see in a candidate? (21:33)Slow and steady wins the race (25:17)How does Scrimba compare to a boot camp? (27:49)If you're a self-taught developer, do this! (29:10)Theo's deep dive into Scrimba (30:51)Let's talk pricing: how much does Scrimba cost compared to a coding bootcamp? And what are the differences between the two? (32:18)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    YT Video: Where to Find Developer Job Openings When You Have No ExperienceThe Front-End Career Path

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Dave Mayer 🇺🇸! Dave is a founder and CEO of Technical Integrity, a boutique recruiting firm famous for its culture-first approach. TI has worked with big companies like Twitter, as well as many mid-size startups. In this episode, you'll get a glimpse into the other side of recruiting. Dave explains his culture-first approach and why it benefits both you and the employer. You'll learn why it's important to know your values and how to make sure you find a company that aligns with them.

    Dave explains why you shouldn't feel desperate if you don't get a job in a company that was your first choice and how to probe into a company's values without sounding disrespectful. From the recruiter side, Dave reveals how looking for a culture fit can backfire and why it's much better to look for a "culture add."

    Dave and Alex also talk about recessions (Dave has lived and worked through three of them already!) and how to stay focused on what's truly important.

    🔗 Connect with Dave

    🐦 Twitter🌐 Website👨🏻‍💼 LinkedIn

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Dave's path as a recruiter: from a traditional approach to focusing on finding a long-term fit between a developer and a company (01:44)What is company culture, and what makes someone a good fit? (03:19)Should you share your company's values? (06:15)Find your own values first (07:24)How can you verify that a company truly embodies what they claim to be their values? (12:10)Ask your interviewer: What does success in your company look like? (16:45)The importance of technical vs soft skills (18:12)Don't care who's hiring, find out where you belong (20:08)Why integrity matters (23:39)Challenges of recruiting, and the difference between the quantity-first and quality-first approach (25:53)Advice for developers who are thinking about approaching recruiters (30:01)We're in a recession. Now what? (33:14)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    Blog post: The Best Engineering Team Values Statement We've Ever SeenSimon Sinek's "Start With Why" Ted talk

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Wemerson Queiroz 🇧🇷! Wemerson never thought he was going to become a developer. He started studying computer science, dropped out, and spent ten years working in sales because he wanted to earn money immediately. Ten years later, he realized he was unhappy (after all, money is not everything), learned to code, and got his first developer job in no time!

    What got him back into IT was Blockchain, so he first started learning Solidity before realizing he should first learn the basics. Shortly after, those basics got him a job at a startup working with Blockchain technology! In this episode, you'll learn how far HTML, CSS, and Javascript can get you and how important it is to follow your passion. You'll also hear about Wemerson's unusual interview process and why taking a chance can sometimes pay off.

    🔗 Connect with Wemerson

    👨🏻‍💼 LinkedIn🌐 Website👩‍🚀 GitHub🐦 Twitter

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Wemerson's journey into tech (02:44)How important is money? (05:13)How Wemerson decided to leave his previous career behind and learn to code (06:45)On diving head-first into Blockchain and Solidity... and then going back to basics (08:29)How Wemerson landed his first developer job after only three months of learning to code (09:47)Why junior developers should look for work opportunities as soon as they can (11:00)On motivation, passion, and learning (14:29)Why context matters in problem-solving (15:43)About the Web3 startup excal.tv, where Wemerson got his first developer job (18:18)What's it like working at a startup as a junior developer? (20:50)How Wemerson landed this opportunity? (25:18)Was Emerson put off by an unorthodox interview process? (26:59)Wemerson's plans for the future (27:56)

    🧰 Resources mentioned

    The Frontend Developer Career PathLearn React for free!

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Josh W. Comeau 🇨🇦! Josh is a developer, indie hacker, educator, and author. He worked in some companies you might have heard of (including, but not limited to, DigitalOcean, Gatsby, and Khan Academy). He also wrote a book on how to build an effective web dev portfolio. In this episode, we're answering that and many other questions! Spoiler alert: all the advice is actionable.

    You'll learn why you need to have a portfolio, how to make one, and is there a formula that works. Josh will teach you how to steal a design for your portfolio website and not get caught and how to develop an eye for design in the long run. Plus: why everybody needs junior developers and how to create an exciting portfolio project even if you don't have any niche interests to base them on. Josh and Alex also discuss handy tools you can use, writing cover letters, and hiring biases in the industry.


    🔗 Connect with Josh

    👨🏻‍💼 LinkedIn🌐 Blog + Website🐦 Twitter

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Josh's trajectory from development to education (01:09)Why Josh wrote a book on web developer portfolios (02:12)Don't put skill bars on your website! What do they even mean?! (04:40)Who should you cater your portfolio to, and how to do it? There are two main target audiences. (06:16)How does a portfolio compare to a LinkedIn profile or a resume? (10:53)Why everybody needs to hire juniors (12:41)Can you get away with not having a portfolio? (14:40)What to do if you're a developer but not good at design? (16:00)Why minimal design could be better (21:53)Can you use a template? (23:45)What should you put on your portfolio website (25:46)How to present your projects (29:49)How to choose your projects... and write about them (31:10)How to write a good cover letter (34:58)How to approach looking for a job (39:07)Hiring biases in the industry (40:56)

    🧰 Resources mentioned

    Josh's book, Building an Effective Dev Portfolio (it's FREE!)xScopePixelSnapFontpair

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Jonathan Gauthier 🇨🇦! Jonathan volunteered when the company where he worked needed somebody to figure out how to turn a Figma design into a website. The rest is history.

    After quitting that job, Jonathan gave himself three months to properly learn front-end development and get his first developer job. And he succeeded! In this interview, he shares how. Yes, Jonathan was pulling long hours, but there's more to it!

    Jonathan talks about his way of learning and why knowing how to approach a problem is better than knowing the exact method of solving it. You'll also learn why it's good to find a mentor - and how to find one! Lastly, Jonathan shares his approach to looking for a job online and why it's important to interview your interviewer. Believe it or not, the latter can make or break your interview process!


    🔗 Connect with Jonathan

    👨🏻‍💼 LinkedIn🐦 Twitter🤖 Pancarte#2314 on the Scrimba Discord

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Jonathan's journey into coding by way of learning to translate designs in Figma into a website + his introduction to Scrimba (01:59)How Jonathan quit his job and had only three months to learn to code and get a job in front-end (04:14)What's manual QA, and was that a helpful background to a new developer? (05:41)Learn the approach, not the method (06:29)How Jonathan decided to switch careers(07:27)Why you should apply when others think you're ready (08:53)Jonathan's study plan (10:21)How can you study both properly and fast? (11:41)The importance of taking breaks (14:10)How Jonathan found a mentor and why are mentors important (15:10)Jonathan's approach to finding his first developer job: LinkedIn, Angel.co, and messaging recruiters directly (17:43)How to optimize your LinkedIn profile (19:16)Jonathan's interview process (21:22)How to interview your interviewers and why that gives you an advantage (22:15)What skills should a junior developer have? (24:44)How Jonathan got his job offer (27:13)Jonathan's new company + Do you have to know Agile? (28:21)How to ask questions as a junior (29:38)Closing advice: don't stress about feeling ready; remember to take breaks, and come up with personal projects! (31:18)On notetaking (32:12)

    🧰 Resources mentioned

    Jonathan's LinkedIn profileThe Frontend Developer Career PathHTML and CSS crash course with Kevin PowellProgrammingBuddies() on RedditNo WhiteboardAngel.co

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Nadia Zhuk 🇧🇾! Nadia made a switch to coding from journalism at the age of 25. That decision has got her moving countries not once but twice! Nowadays, she lives in London, works at Intercom, and helps aspiring developers. She's also written a book, Crossing the Rubycon, filled with practical advice and insider tips on learning to code and building a programming career.

    In this episode, Nadia shares her story and many things she's learned along the way! You'll get to know what's it like to learn to code without a technical background, how to manage your mindset and mental health during the process, and what's Nadia's take on choosing your first programming language. Nadia and Alex also discuss common stereotypes about programming, gatekeeping within the industry, and what are the critical but often overlooked factors in choosing what to learn.


    🔗 Connect with Nadia

    👨🏻‍💼 LinkedIn🌐 Dev.to🐦 Twitter📹 YouTube

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Nadia's journey into coding and move to Poland (01:41)Can you learn to code with no computer education whatsoever? (06:48)Why Nadia chose the self-taught route (08:16)How and why Nadia chose to learn Ruby (11:17)What influences your choice of a programming language (13:33)How to choose your first coding language if you're not technical (14:43)What to do (and what not to do) if you're learning to code on your own (17:03)Is coding creative? (23:17)The biggest stereotypes about being a programmer... and why they're wrongCan anyone learn to code? (28:26)Gatekeeping in the industry - and gatekeeping that's self-imposed (29:50)Quick-fire questions: favorite programming language, JavaScript, frameworks, chatbots, caffeinated beverages, London, and cats! (32:54)

    🧰 Resources mentioned

    Nadia's book, Crossing the Rubycon: How to Learn to Code and Build a Programming CareerWomen Who Code

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Ollie Church 🇬🇧! Ollie started out as an actor. He took up coding as a hobby during a lockdown and made a puzzle game partially inspired by an escape room where he worked at the time. Now he works in fintech!

    This episode is about lockdowns, hobbies, motivation, and having fun. Ollie talks about his career change and approach to goal-setting. He also shares advice on choosing portfolio projects, as well as dealing with rejection - something that actors are maybe even more familiar with than new developers.

    You'll find out how an online game he made for fun brought Ollie some income even before he landed his firs junior developer role, and what it's like to accidentally be interviewed for a senior role when you're applying for a junior position. Spoiler: Ollie did get the job in the end!

    You'll also get an inside scoop on working as an actor, and how the pandemic has impacted the world of performing arts and in-person experiences.

    🔗 Connect with Ollie

    👨🏻‍💼 LinkedIn🌐 Website👩‍🚀 GitHub🐦 Twitter🎥 Acting reel

    ⏰ Timestamps

    What is's like being an actor (01:59)Theater, in-person experiences, and performing arts during the COVID-19 pandemic (03:18)How Ollie took up coding (07:55)Front-end development as a hobby (09:34)How Ollie and his partner created their first online puzzle game (11:43)How to make learning to code playful, and how to choose portfolio projects (14:17)Ollie's puzzle game became a work project! Here's how that happened. (17:13)Should you apply before you're ready? How Ollie navigated changing careers and defined his goals and deadlines (20:53)Ollie's job hunt stats (25:51)An interview process from hell (16:15)How Ollie got his current job - it started with a rejection (30:13)How to deal with rejection and when is the common advice about it actually useful (31:03)The interview that got Ollie his current job... and how it went wrong (33:30)First months on the job and imposter syndrome (38:33)Ollie's closing advice for new developers: do the projects you think are fun and focus on showing up. It's a marathon, not a sprint!

    🧰 Resources mentioned

    The Frontend Developer Career Path"Happy", by Derren Brown

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Guil Hernandez 🇺🇸! You've heard of a learning curve, but what about the forgetting curve? Don't worry, Guil can help you not get overwhelmed. He is a developer and educator with over 15 years of experience in tech, and in this episode, he teaches you how to get better at learning. Guil and Alex also talk about Scrimba Bootcamp, a brand new study program that Guil has been working on.

    Guil has developed over one hundred coding courses and workshops and comes from a teaching environment, so he also answers the dreaded question of what makes a good teacher. You'll also learn different learning techniques that might work for you, what's the Ebbinghaus' forgetting curve, and what it was like to make stuff for the web back in the early days of Web 2.0. Alex and Guil also discuss scopes, structure, and the importance of storytelling in teaching, as well as why you won't vibe with every YouTube tutorial out there... but you might still want to learn from multiple sources.

    🔗 Connect with Guil

    🐦 Twitter🌐 Website👩‍🚀 Github🤖 Guil from Scrimba#6455 on the Scrimba Discord

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Guil got into coding (01:18)Web development in the early days of Web 2.0 (03:02)Do you need a computer science degree to consider yourself a developer? (04:50)How Guil became a teacher (06:17)What makes a good teacher (07:18)The science of learning (10:38)What's the forgetting curve, and what you can do about it (11:54)How to not make a learning process overwhelming (14:07)Learning techniques that work for Guil: Scheduling study time, Pomodoro technique, Keeping a study log (16:15)Scrimba now has Solo projects: What are they, and how can they help you learn better? (20:32)What is Scrimba Bootcamp and the benefits of code reviews and getting feedback (25:24)Quick-fire questions: Code editors, coding music, Web 3.0, and Puerto Rico (27:48)Closing advice: be a librarian, not an encyclopedia


    🧰 Resources mentioned

    Scrimba BootcampComparing Scrimba Pro and Scrimba Bootcamp plans

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Yin Chu Rijnaard 🇳🇱! Yin Chu is a new developer who landed a job offer after only seven months of learning to code! In the meantime, he also became a Scrimba Community Hero.

    In this episode, Yin Chu shares his approach to learning to code, why he chose front-end development and some of the struggles he encountered along the way. He also talks about his involvement in the Scrimba Discord community and how he became our Community Hero. On Scrimba's Discord, you can award karma points to other users, and Yin is currently on top of the leaderboard. You'll learn more about online communities, their unexpected benefits, and Yin Chu's approach to helping other newbie developers online.

    Plus: Alex shares Scrimba's origin story!

    🔗 Connect with Yin Chu

    👨🏻‍💼 LinkedIn🌐 Website👩‍🚀 GitHub🐦 Twitter🤖 YinChuRijnaard#2266 on the Scrimba Discord

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Yin Chu got into coding by way of business school (01:27)Front-end development for visual learners (02:40)How Yin Chu learned to code while at work (04:11)Yin's approach to learning (05:11)Learning to code when English is not your first language (09:04)How to become a Scrimba community hero (11:39)A surprising benefit of being in Scrimba's Discord community (15:10)Why you should help people (16:20)Yin Chu's new job... and LinkedIn's Easy Apply (17:23)Good LinkedIn profile strategies (19:29)Yin Chu's interview process (21:24)You have to play the long game (24:50)

    🧰 Resources mentioned

    Free JavaScript courseScrimba's Discord Server

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Cameron 🇬🇧! Cameron is a full-stack software engineer, podcaster, and co-founder of The Coder Career. But before learning to code, he studied business... and worked as a tech recruiter! This episode is all about networking. How to do it? What to say? And... To whom? Do you have to be an extrovert to become good at it?

    Cameron will teach you why networking is important and how to go about it. He will also give you scripts for different situations - from reaching out to a recruiter on LinkedIn to starting a conversation with somebody at a meetup. Alex and Cameron discuss how to stand out when applying for a job and how recruiters operate. There are more junior developers than junior positions, and we hope this episode will help you get your foot in the door! Or, at least, nurture your professional relationships - you never know when can they come in handy.

    🔗 Connect with Cameron

    🐦 Twitter🌐 The Coder Career🔈 The Coder Career podcast episode with Simon Barker

    🧰 Resources mentioned

    Never Eat Alone

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Ansub Khan 🇮🇳! Ansub has always been drawn to front-end development, but he took a couple of detours: he studied computer science and tried to learn C, C++, Java, and Python. In the end, he got a job by creating a website for a self-sustaining AI, while chatting to his now CEO about robots and quantum mechanics.

    In this episode, you'll learn how to know when to go back to the basics of what you're learning, why rushing to get a job isn't always a good idea, and how a sprinkle of stoic philosophy can help you on your journey. Ansub shares details of his pretty unconventional job interview, as well as his approach to figuring out which jobs to apply to. He also talks about all of his failed job applications and what he learned from them.

    🔗 Connect with Ansub

    👨🏻‍💼 LinkedIn🌐 Website👩‍🚀 GitHub🐦 Twitter

    🧰 Resources mentioned

    Scrimba's Front End Career PathBob's React course (FREE!)Maya Labs

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    You can also Tweet Alex from Scrimba at @bookercodes and tell them what lessons you learned from the episode so they can thank you personally for tuning in 🙏

  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Shannon Brown 🇺🇸! Shannon is an experienced tech recruiter in a company known for diversity. In this interview, she will teach you how to get your foot in the door even if you're coming from an unconventional background. A good recruiter should know how to recognize an overlap between your skills and job requirements, but there are also things you can do to make your application stand out.

    In this episode, we're talking about the dreaded ATS, the importance of storytelling, and cover letters (which might not be as crucial as you'd think... unless they're required)! You will learn how recruiters operate and what they're looking for, and why both recruiters and job applicants should be in it for the long game. You'll also find out when is the right time to apply for a job and how to troubleshoot an unsuccessful application. Plus: photos on CVs, font preferences, free resume reviews, and tough coffees.

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Shannon's work as a technical recruiter (01:02)The importance of domain knowledge (03:57)What recruiters do, what they should do, and why some of them have a bad reputation (05:54)Why both recruiters and job-seekers should focus more on building relationships (10:21)How to contact a recruiter, and what's the ideal first message (12:31) Should you be afraid of an ATS (application tracking system)? (14:39)When is the best time to apply for a job? (16:29)What is a well-optimized resume? (19:01)Are cover letters necessary? (22:48)Cover letters as a tool to provide additional information (24:50)Storytelling on your resume (28:34)How to know when not to use job-hunting advice from influencers (30:00)Setting career goals helps you write a better job application (31:17)How to get free feedback on your resume (32:46)Quick-fire questions: fonts and photos on a resume, practicing self-care during a job search, debugging your job applicationWhat is the most important thing to do when looking for a job? (38:21)

    🔗 Connect with Shannon

    🐦 Twitter👨🏻‍💼 LinkedIn


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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Kynnedy 🇺🇸! She recently made history as the first student who found a job through Scrimba's Discord! She originally wanted to be an air traffic controller, but ended up working in hospitality. After she became a mom, Kynnedy decided on a career change. And she succeeded! 🎉

    In this episode, you'll get handy tips on how to learn better and make whatever you're learning stick. Kynnedy shares what she did right, but also what she did wrong, as well as her approach to creating a more memorable developer portfolio. You'll hear her story about learning enough about front-end development to go from zero to becoming a code reviewer on Scrimba in only a few months. Plus: how to know you're ready to apply for jobs, and how how to code with a baby. :)


    🔗 Connect with Kynnedy

    👨🏻‍💼 LinkedIn🌐 Website🐦 Twitter

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Kynnedy got into coding (02:00)Bootcamp vs a self-directed route (04:03)Learning to code while being a new parent (04:57)Kynnedy's path and learning style with Scrimba (05:49)Dealing with self-doubt when learning to code (06:58)How to choose projects for you developer portfolio? (09:38)How Kynnedy knew she was ready to start applying for jobs (14:22)How Kynnedy put herself out there... and got no results (14:57)Getting an interview through Scrimba's discord (16:00)Kynnedy as a code reviewer on Scrimba (17:42)Kynnedy's interview process (19:50)Coding advice for younger Kynnedy (25:48)

    🧰 Resources mentioned

    Scrimba's Front End Career PathGary Simon on YouTubeBuild and deploy your portfolio with Kevin Powell

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Kevin Powell 🇨🇦! Kevin is a CSS Evangelist and educator. He makes weekly YouTube videos, streams on twitch, writes articles, and teaches courses. His mission is to show new developers that CSS is fun and teach them how it works... and why it works the way it does.

    In this episode, you'll learn how not to get frustrated with CSS, how to debug it, why people struggle with it, and how come we might never see a launch of CSS 4. Kevin also explains why different browsers render CSS differently and how much should you actually care about that. Alex and Kevin also discuss how the web gets made behind the scenes and how you can join the conversation and suggest the features you'd like to see in certain technologies. Plus: Bad design trends, tools and plugins, CSS memes, and tabs vs spaces.


    🔗 Connect with Kevin

    📹 YouTube🐦 Twitter🌐 Website👩‍🚀 GitHub

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Kevin found himself in the world of web design (01:28)Can a new developer focus solely on CSS? (04:26)What is a CSS Evangelist? (07:12)Why do people struggle with CSS? (09:04)Why CSS works the way it does (12:15)CSS tools you should use (14:12)CSS extensions for your editor (16:14)The learning curve of CSS and the importance of experience 18:04Why different browsers render CSS differently (and why it sometimes doesn't work) (21:18)Progressive enhancement and accessibility (25:53)The history of CSS (29:21)Will there ever be a CSS4? (33:11)How to stay in the loop and join the conversation around features (35:18)Quick-fire questions (37:33)

    🧰 Resources mentioned

    Kevin's courses on ScrimbaMiriam SuzanneAdam ArgyleModern CSS

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    If you enjoy this episode please leave a 5 star review here and let us know who you want to see on the next podcast.


    You can also Tweet Alex from Scrimba at @bookercodes and tell them what lessons you learned from the episode so they can thank you personally for tuning in 🙏