Afleveringen

  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Amy Corson 🇺🇸! Amy is a recently hired new developer. She's also an aspiring comedian! During the pandemic, she realized she was unhappy with her day job and decided to change it. So: this episode is both insightful and funny!

    In this interview, Amy talks about learning to code and how her brother, also a self-taught developer, introduced her to Scrimba. You'll learn about ghost buses, local coding meetups, and how help can come from the unlikeliest of places. Amy also teaches you how to pick a coding project you're not going to give up on, even if it might give you food poisoning. Ultimately, you will hear how Amy approached both studying and applying for jobs, how she prepared for the job interview that landed her the job she's doing now, and why vague emails from recruiters are even more stressful when you're in the mountains.

    🔗 Connect with Amy

    👩‍💼 Linkedin🌐 Website👩‍🚀 Github

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    The Front-End Developer Career PathScrimba's Discord server!

    ⭐️ Leave a Review


    If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5-star review here and tell us who you want to see on the next podcast.


    You can also Tweet Alex from Scrimba at @bookercodes and tell them what lessons you learned from the episode so they can thank you personally for tuning in 🙏

  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Stephanie Chiu 🇺🇸! Stephanie is a self-taught iOS software engineer and career coach. She's also a chemical engineer who thought she would never code... until she met people who actually worked in tech!

    In this episode, you'll learn everything about her path to becoming a developer and landing her first job at PayPal! You'll also learn how important it was for Stephanie to be a part of a local developer community. Stephanie will teach you how to optimize your LinkedIn (and think about what recruiters see), seek mentorship, and reach out to senior developers for coffee chats, even if you're introverted.

    Stephanie and Alex share excellent tips to help you find your niche and stand out as a new developer. They also discuss predictions for the state of the industry and job market in 2023.

    🔗 Connect with Stephanie

    📸 Instagram👩‍💼 Linkedin🌐 Website🐦 Twitter👩‍🚀 Github

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Stephanie started coding even though she thought she would never do that (01:36)The life of a chemical engineer working as a production supervisor and why Stephanie wanted to change careers (04:28)The collaborative nature of getting into tech and how to do coffee chats with developers (05:52)Why you should go to hackathons (07:13)Why getting out of your comfort zone can lead to cool stuff (08:17)How Stephanie surrounded herself with tech people and why that was helpful (09:16)Should a junior developer work remotely or in person? (11:48)Ad break! Reading your podcast reviews + next week on the show: a comedian-turned-developer Amy Corson! (14:00)How Stephanie picked her tech stack and approach learning to code, and why you shouldn't focus on collecting certificates (16:58)Why iOS developer communities are tightly knit (20:51)Why iOS developers generally receive higher compensation (21:55)How Stephanie got her job at PayPal and why you shouldn't sleep on LinkedIn (25:32)Do small companies hire juniors in the current job market? (27:34)How Stephanie was found on LinkedIn by a manager at PayPal... and then rejected (28:50)The engineers replied back to Stephanie's thank you email, she took up one of them on an offer to help her with learning, and the rest is history! (30:56)The engineers initially doubted Stephanie (32:28)How Stephanie's manager needed somebody who could think outside the box (35:24)What is more important for junior developers: a resume, portfolio, LinkedIn, or GitHub? (37:46)How to teach LinkedIn's algorithm what is it that you want to become (39:55)The key to using LinkedIn is curation (40:53)How the Skills section on LinkedIn makes a difference in what you see and who reaches out (42:33)People don't scroll, so put the most essential things on top! (44:17)What recruiters see on LinkedIn, and why Stephanie put her GitHub projects into the Experience section (45:36)Stephanie's take on the state of the job market in 2023 (47:24)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    Levels.fyi - Salaries and tools to level up your careerScrimba podcast with Austin Henline: How to make your LinkedIn profile standout according to a LinkedIn expertScrimba's Discord server!

    ⭐️ Leave a Review


    If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5-star review here and tell us who you want to see on the next podcast.


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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Marleigh Morgan 🇺🇸! Marleigh is a recently hired graphic designer turned developer. She has always wanted to learn to code, and she tried to study computer science but gave up after it turned out that, at her university, she was supposed to write Java on paper. During the pandemic, she picked up coding again. Two years later, she changed careers!

    In this episode, Marleigh will teach you how to balance learning to code with having a full-time job. She also talks about online communities and how to benefit from them, the importance of developing independent projects for your portfolio, and why you shouldn't be afraid to take breaks when you need them. She also shares how she eventually changed career paths within the company she was already working at and how she knew she was ready to apply for jobs.

    🔗 Connect with Marleigh

    👩‍💼 Linkedin🌐 Website🐦 Twitter👩‍🚀 Github🤖 kittywizard#9211 on Scimba Discord

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Marleigh was interested in coding, but gave up after her university wanted her to write Java on paper (01:27)Marleigh went back to coding after changing majors and working as a designer for ten years (02:22)What made Marleigh pick up programming again (03:57)The importance of being consistent (06:05)How Marleigh learned coding alongside a full-time job (06:28)Marleigh's advice for everybody learning to code alongside work (07:41)The difference in mindset between learning to code as a hobby and learning to code as a career path (10:05)Ad break: Next week, it's Stephanie Chiu!How specifically Marleigh learned to code (14:34)Do you ever feel ready to apply for jobs? (16:44)Remote vs on-site work for junior developers (17:55)Marleigh is a Scrimba Community Hero with over 2000 messages on our discord server. Here's how she discovered the Scrimba Community (19:33)Why being in a developer community is important when you're starting out (20:50)Job applications don't always pan out - here's how Marleigh knew when to take a step back and tweak her resume (21:13)Marley eventually ended up changing careers internally - here's how it happened (23:10)Did they grill Marleigh about her coding skills? (27:33)The perks of being in the Scrimba community while job searching (28:41)It's okay to take breaks! (30:37)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    The Front-End Developer Career PathScrimba's Discord server!

    ⭐️ Leave a Review


    If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5-star review here and tell us who you want to see on the next podcast.


    You can also Tweet Alex from Scrimba at @bookercodes and tell them what lessons you learned from the episode so they can thank you personally for tuning in 🙏

  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Don Hansen 🇺🇸! Don is a software engineer and developer mentor who helps aspiring juniors land their first opportunity. He's also a Youtuber, podcaster, and streamer who met his first boss on Twitch!

    In this episode, Don and Alex talk about career changes, leaving a good first impression, and the state of the job market right now. You'll learn whether you should consider attending a coding bootcamp or stick to a self-directed path, how to see past the marketing copy on a coding bootcamp's website, and how to actually look at networking (especially if you're bad at it). Don also shares valuable insights on all the things you might be doing wrong if you're just starting your job search.

    🔗 Connect with Don

    👨‍💼 Linkedin🌐 Website📹 Youtube📹 Twitch

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Don always coded as a hobby (01:19)Bridging the gap between a hobbyist and a professional: it's a shift in mindset (02:56)How to keep coding playful while maintaining discipline (05:02)How did Don go about getting his first coding job? (06:23)Don met his first boss on Twitch! (07:20)Why is providing transparency very powerful + are you curious about coding? (09:01)What Don learned from failed job applications (11:21)How you should think about networking (13:10)Ad break! Next week, it's Marleigh Morgan! (14:52)Fight shyness with exposure (16:21)How James Mariott fought his insecurities by streaming, and why streaming can be a great strategy for you (19:03)On imposter syndrome: it never goes away (20:32)Why you should train yourself to be a problem solver (23:25)Don put stuff you don't know (or senior developers, for that matter) on a pedestal (25:47)Short-term vs long-term goals (26:19)How to pick your area of expertise, and why Don picked CSS (30:10)Should you sign up for a bootcamp or choose a self-directed route? (34:32)Can you pick a bootcamp based on their success rate? (38:24)What to do if you're applying for junior developer jobs but never hearing back? (42:39)Coding ability vs. soft skills, and why it's important to learn presentation skills (45:58)What's the motivation behind Don's YouTube channel? (48:13)How to look for jobs during a recession (51:05)The only surefire way to fail is to quit (55:47)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    DonTheDeveloper YouTube channelDon's YT video: How I Got My First Web Developer JobDon't review of ScrimbaShould aspiring developers be worried about the recession?Scrimba podcast: Code Like Nobody Is Watching: On Community, Learning, and Finding the Right Culture Fit, With Scrimba Student James

    ⭐️ Leave a Review


    If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5-star review here and tell us who you want to see on the next podcast.


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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Mislav Markušić 🇭🇷! Mislav is a new developer from Croatia who has changed careers at the age of 40. After attending law school and realizing it wasn't a good fit for him, he spent 14 years working in a record store! Now, he's a junior developer.

    In this episode, Mislav shares how he decided to pursue coding, how long it took, and how he managed to do it alongside a full-time job and a family. Mislav and Alex discuss taking breaks, knowing you're ready to apply for jobs, and whether or not a junior should learn TypeScript. Mislav also talks about his portfolio, how having a well-thought-out portfolio can help you stand out in a sea of candidates, and how you can prepare for your job interview by listening to podcasts!

    🔗 Connect with Mislav

    👨‍💼Linkedin🌐 Portfolio🌐 Blog🐦Twitter

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Mislav started coding after dropping out of law school and working in a record store for 14 years (01:22)How Mislav knew which technologies to focus on (05:07)How Mislav approached learning to code (06:54)Hurry up, but slowly (08:33)Ad break! Check out our video where Alex is reenacting a day in a life as a learner. Next week on the podcast, it's Don Hansen! (10:55)Mislav wasn't ready too apply for jobs, but a friend of his thought otherwise (13:22)The hiring manager loved how Mislav presented himself. Here's what he did, and how he picked his portfolio projects! (14:55)Podcasts were the single best resource for Mislav when it comes to nailing the interview. Here's why (18:20)Mislav's interview process (20:22)Mislav's new job! (23:13)What's the first week of his first developer job been like for Mislav? (23:47)How fast do you learn coding at home, and how fast do you learn on the job? (26:55)How you feel about your abilities can change within a month (28:04)What would Mislav do differently, and why is that - learning TypeScript? (29:03)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    Blog: Mislav's Roadmap to Getting Hired as a Frontent DevMislav's portfolioYouTube video: A day in the life of a self-taught React developer in LondonScrimba's Discord server!

    ⭐️ Leave a Review


    If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5-star review here and tell us who you want to see on the next podcast.


    You can also Tweet Alex from Scrimba at @bookercodes and tell them what lessons you learned from the episode so they can thank you personally for tuning in 🙏

  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Katy Ashby 🇬🇧! Katy studied physics before becoming a developer, and once she did, she went from a complete novice to a principal developer and team lead in only four years! In this episode, Katy shares how she fast-tracked her career and how you can do the same.

    In this episode, Katy talks about why you should remain curious, how to recognize opportunities to progress in a company, and what makes a senior developer. Katy shares her view on whether you should seek a remote position as a junior developer and the benefits of staying at a job for longer. Alex and Katy also discuss contractors and whether you should be wary of them (or become one). Also: HTML for Dummies, and rats!

    🔗 Connect with Katy

    👩‍💼 Linkedin🌐 Website🐦 Twitter

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Katy never thought she was going to become a developer, even though she dabbled with coding as a child (01:06)How Katy worked on her first website as a kid and kept coding playful (01:54)Katy never thought about studying computer science because her computer classes at school were boring, and she ended up majoring in physics with a minor in French! (04:23)Why a developer career, in hindsight, was a perfectly logical choice for Katy (06:25)How Katy went from a beginner to a principal developer in four years (07:27)Ad break! Next week, it's Mislav Markušić! (12:21)What made Katy determined to climb the ranks? (14:13)Why becoming a senior developer is more about your attitude than just your coding skills (15:07)Did Katy know much about software development jobs before she got her first one? (16:10)More and more physicists are becoming coders. Here's why (17:05)What Katy learned over the course of four years (19:08)How Katy used the experience of using Python for a physics internship to kickstart her coding journey (19:55)Is there anything that Katy would do differently? (23:42)What challenges did Katy face when she started working? (25:29)How Katy turned a graduate role into an actual job (27:55)Consider the whole offer, and not just the salary (30:40)Should junior developers work remotely or in person? (32:45)Why applying for jobs at other companies can get you a raise (34:18)How does everybody working remotely change the job landscape? What's the difference between employees and contractors? (37:46)How Katy took a break between jobs and shared her knowledge with the community (42:09)Quick-fire questions: favorite places in the UK, Anglo-Indian food, coffee, and keeping rats as pets! (45:07)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    DummiesScrimba's Discord server!

    ⭐️ Leave a Review


    If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5-star review here and tell us who you want to see on the next podcast.


    You can also Tweet Alex from Scrimba at @bookercodes and tell them what lessons you learned from the episode so they can thank you personally for tuning in 🙏

  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Sylvialynn Favello 🇺🇸! Sylvia got exposed to coding accidentally: by watching online courses for fun after she took a break from work and studying so that she could have surgery. Today, she works at Docker! She will teach us how to stay on track even when our brains don't want to.

    In this episode, Sylvia will give us her insights on how to recognize you're heading towards burnout, how to keep learning fun, and how to remain motivated. She also talks about working on her self-confidence and public speaking by participating in communities and Twitter spaces (the latter is also how she met her hiring manager!), as well as how she found a way to enjoy the learning process for what it is. Spoiler alert: you'll get many unconventional study tips, but they might work for you!

    Alex and Sylvia also discuss programming with ADHD, why being a developer is rewarding, and how you can turn perceived failures into learning experiences.

    🔗 Connect with Sylvia

    👩‍💼 Linkedin🌐 Hashnode👩‍🚀 GitHub🌐 Website🐦 Twitter

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Sylvia started learning to code because she was bored and wanted to learn... anything (01:48)Alex met Sylvia a year ago when she was joining Twitter spaces to work on her self-confidence and public speaking. Here's how it went down! (03:59)Why you should try different things until you find something that sticks (05:12)How Sylvia's dream about studying at Harvard turned into a passion for coding (05:53)How Alex got exposed to coding by watching videos from Stanford, and Sylvia's unconventional learning practices (07:09)Developers with ADHD and how programming can be stimulating (11:12)Ad break: Have you heard our show with Jessica Chan? Coming up next week, lead software engineer Katy Ashby.Sylvialynn's approach to learning and why you shoulud follow your cuiosity (15:27)Why you should always be open to tweaking your goals and plans (17:21)Finding motivation in challenges (18:39)Keep learning fun! (20:06)How to recognize and avoid burnout? (23:18)Why you should enjoy the journey, not the destination (26:44)When did Sylvia feel she was ready to start applying for jobs? (28:12)How Sylvia chose her portfolio project (29:34)What resources did she use to learn JavaScript and React? (30:25)Sylvia's approach to findind a job (spoiler: in the end, community is always important) (31:26)Why you should start working on your presentation skills right away (34:13)How to deal with mental setbacks in networking and socializing (39:16)Sylvia met a hiring manager at Docker in a Twitter space! (43:33)Are you an introvert... or an anxious extrovert (45:33)Sylvia's interview process at Docker (47:33)What is it like being an intern at Docker? (49:47)What's it like doing an internship remotely? (51:00)Technical vs behavioral questions for a Docker internship (53:12)How long did the internship last and did it come with a promise of a possible job opportunity? (54:46)Keep trying different things! (57:19)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    How to speakCS50's Introduction to Computer Science on edXMia Bala on TwitterScrimba's Front-End Developer Career PathSylvia's project, Blue SignalScrimba Podcast: How To Learn To Code From the Free Content on YouTube, With Jessica ChanScrimba Podcast: Communication skills for developers with Dylan Israel from AmazonfreeCodeCampLearn Python for Free on ScrimbaScrimba's Discord server!

    ⭐️ Leave a Review


    If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5-star review here and tell us who you want to see on the next podcast.


    You can also Tweet Alex from Scrimba at @bookercodes and tell them what lessons you learned from the episode so they can thank you personally for tuning in 🙏

  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Alexander Lee 🇺🇸! Alexander, also known as TechRally, is a front-end engineer at Amazon. He's also a developer coach, Youtuber, and career changer. In this episode, TechRally teaches you how to solve a number of challenges you might face as a junior developer trying to break into the industry.

    Alex (the host) and Alex (the guest) discuss the pros and cons of bootcamps, as well as developer portfolios, job market trends, and whether job hunting is similar to... dating. You'll also learn what's the least you can do to stand out as an applicant and how to make sure you really stand out. TechRally will teach you how to approach your portfolio project, how to keep up the motivation, and what to do when you feel stuck in your job search.

    🔗 Connect with TechRally

    📹 YouTube🐦 Twitter📸 Instagram👨‍💼 LinkedIn🌐 Website

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Alexander Lee decided to enroll into a coding bootcamp and become a developer (01:48)Bootcamps vs. traditional education (03:16)Are bootcamps a good path for people learning to code and breaking into tech? Is there a difference between bootcamps in 2015 and bootcamps today? (05:02)The best advice for aspiring developers (07:59)What should you do if you think you're doing everything right but you still don't hear back after you apply for jobs? (09:39)Ad break! Have you listened to our interview with Madison Kanna? Plus: You can leave a review of our podcast and make the producer smile. Next Tuesday: Sylvia Favello, who started learning to code because she was bored after surgery!Your developer portfolio and resume should be the best at the start of your career (16:31)How many projects should you have in your developer portfolio? (18:31)How Alexander landed a job at Amazon (19:19)Why do there seem to be fewer recruiters reaching out at the moment? (21:28)What is the current state of the tech job market, and is there enough work for juniors? (22:42)Should you worry about seasonal trends in the job market? (25:24)What are the aspects of the hiring process that a junior developer can control? (26:43)Job hunting vs. Tinder (30:46)What kind of projects should you have in your portfolio? (33:14)One solid project kills two birds with one stone (34:34)How to stay motivated while building bigger projects (36:26)Quick-fire questions: coffee, front-end frameworks, and Korean food! (41:13)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    TechRally Youtube ChannelScrimba Podcast: Homeschooler, College Dropout, Developer and Master Networker: Crush Your Career with Madison KannaScrimba's Discord server!

    ⭐️ Leave a Review


    If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5-star review here and tell us who you want to see on the next podcast.


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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet James Marriott 🇬🇧! He's a software developer and a career changer who previously worked in education, project management, and communications. He devoted himself to learning to code during a lockdown because he likes making things! In this episode, you'll hear how he found a way to get more comfortable coding in front of interviewers by streaming on YouTube, avoided emails to stay motivated, and ultimately landed a job at a company that perfectly fits his personality.

    James also talks about impostor syndrome, the importance of finding a community, and how being open about not knowing something can benefit you in the long run. He and Alex also discuss whether coding skills alone are enough to land you your first job and whether your previous work experience is relevant when you're breaking into tech.

    🔗 Connect with James

    👨‍💼 LinkedIn

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How James decided to become a developer after decades of waiting (02:31)How did James learn to code? (04:18)How does one go from hobbyist to professional? Plus, the true value of Scrimba (05:26)How James connected to other coders in the community (07:06)The difficulty of changing careers later in life (09:30)Ad break! Have you listened to our interview with Quincy Larson? How to support us and who's on next week (10:29)Changing careers in your 40s: advantage or disadvantage? (13:30)What do you have in your 40s that you don't have in your 20s? (16:06)Where does motivation come from? (17:03)How James approached finding his first developer job (18:40)James set up an email filter so that he couldn't see rejections! (19:32)Focusing on the things you can control (20:32)James was interviewed by three companies - here's how it went down (21:25)What James learned from his first interview and how he battled his fear of live coding by... streaming on YouTube! (23:40)Why should you learn how to explain your code to other people (27:16)On imposter syndrome (29:10)How James ended up in a company that aligns with his values (31:08)Slow burning motivation, humility, and finding a good fit (34:19)James' interview process and why you shouldn't lie on your resume (36:59)James' technical task and being transparent (42:37)Salaries, how to do them differently, and why a higher salary isn't always a good thing (47:19)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    Scrimba Podcast: Quincy Larson: Why Learning To Code as an Adult Might Be Easier Than You Think Scrimba's blog!Our discord community

    ⭐️ Leave a Review


    If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5-star review here and tell us who you want to see on the next podcast.


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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Caitlyn Greffly 🇺🇸! She's a career changer, developer career mentor, and the author of The Bootamper's Companion, a book of tips she wishes she had known when she was breaking into tech. In her past life, she was a psychologist working in beer. After changing careers at 31, Caitlyn is nowadays a full-stack software engineer with a passion for frontend.

    In her book, Caitlyn shares resources, advice, and approaches to help you stand out and find a job. In this interview, she does the same! You'll hear how she decided to become a developer and chose a path to get there. You'll learn why you shouldn't be intimidated by your more experienced colleagues, and why struggling is essential. Caitlyn and Alex also discuss how employers can help juniors grow and how new developers can figure out if an employer is right for them.

    🔗 Connect with Caitlyn

    👩‍💼 LinkedIn🌐 Website🐦 Twitter

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Caitlyn ended up in programming after studying psychology and working in beer (01:37)Becoming a coder as a woman in a male-dominated industry (03:03)Did Caitlyn have any exposure to coding before attending a bootcamp? (04:39)How Caitlyn knew she was ready for a career change (05:59)The bootcamp landscape in 2019 and why Caitlyn chose that instead of a self-directed route (08:35)How Caitlyn found a bootcamp that worked for her life circumstances (10:06)Ad break: We had a bootcamp mentor on the show! (13:04)What Caitlyn found more challenging - coding itself or maintaining positivity and motivation (15:08)The importance of struggling and what to do when you struggle (18:17)Why you should time box (21:22)Caitlyn’s book, The Bootcamper’s Companion (21:54)How Caitlyn got her first developer job (25:02)On being front of mind and building a community (26:49)The thing that had the biggest impact on Caitlyn’s journey - how one tweet resulted in her hanging out with Scott Hanselman! (29:17)How to get yourself out there as a new developer… if you’re an introvert (32:46)Caitlyn’s experience interviewing (35:45)Are interview processes a necessary evil? (40:28)Don’t forget to interview the company! (42:42)Did Caitlyn feel like she was starting from scratch, changing careers at 31? (46:58)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    Scrimba Podcast: Bootcamp Mentor Hussien Khayoon: Careers Come in Three Stages, and Here’s How To Navigate ThemScrimba Podcast: How to become a successful Junior Developer with Scott Hanselman from MicrosoftBook: The Bootamper's Companion by Caitlyn GrefflyScrimba's Discord server!Thinkful

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Michael Robards 🇺🇸! Michael is a career changer whose path to becoming a developer was a long and winding one: he was a business analyst and a personal trainer; he worked front of house and managed restaurants; he studied biology and worked in customer service. Eventually, he got a developer job at Coca-Cola!

    In this episode, Michael shares his story and his approach to learning and getting a job. He did a lot of things right, and he's also a proof that it's never too late for a carreer change. Michael and Alex also talk about imposter syndrome, difficulties of learning to code while having a full-time job, differences between big and small companies, and why having to keep on learning is a great thing about working in tech.

    🔗 Connect with Michael

    👨‍💼LinkedIn

    ⏰ Timestamps

    Michael's long and winding path to becoming a developer (01:44)Why Michael thought becoming a software developer wasn't right for him (08:17)How Michael commited to learning to code - and did that on company time, at least at first (09:04)On learning to code while having a full-time job (11:56)How Coca-Cola helped Michael on his coding journey (12:45)Ad break: We had a lot of career changers on the podcast. Here's one of them! Plus how to support us, and who's on next week (it's Caitlyn Greffly)!Is there anything Michael would've done differently? (17:43)Why did it take four and a half years for Michael to get a software job at Coke? (20:31)What does it look like to be hired internally? (22:57)How to fight imposter syndrome? (25:12)What kind of a coworker does a junior developer need? (27:32)Why you should do things at your own pace and choose your employers wisely (28:35)Michael's career goals (31:01)Keep on learning! (31:47)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    Some of the career changers we interviewed: Chris, Silvia, Theo, WemersonScrimba's Discord CommunityGrow with GoogleThe Frontend Developer Career PathCodecademyFreecodecamp

    ⭐️ Leave a Review


    If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5-star review here and tell us who you want to see on the next podcast.


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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Madison Kanna 🇺🇸! She's a front-end developer and a creator of a coding book club. She's also a college dropout, a master networker, and a former homeschooler. In this episode, you'll learn about her fascinating journey and get a lot of good, actionable advice!

    Madison will teach you how to figure out what you are actually interested in and how to keep pursuing it. You'll learn about her journey to becoming a developer and how being homeschooled helped her in the early days of her coding career.

    Also in this episode: Why do companies want juniors with experience, and what did Madison do to go around it? Do you get any better at personal branding if you get a domain with your name at the age of nine? Why is it important to work on production code? How to stand out if you don't have a degree?

    Madison also shares how a single tweet turned being laid off into the best experience of her life!

    🔗 Connect with Madison

    👩🏼‍💼 LinkedIn🌐 Website🐦 Twitter👩‍🚀 Github

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Madison dropped out of college and decided to learn to code (01:28)Do you need a college degree? (02:50)What's it like being homeschooled, and did it help Madison teach herself development? (04:11)How to avoid burnout as you're learning to code? (06:20)How to tackle projects as a self-taught developer? (08:09)How to follow your curiosity? (11:48)What was Madison's goal? (14:07)When should you start applying for jobs? Also, MOMS! (15:37)Madison and her sister, Randall, both became developers. Were their parents an influence there? (18:40)Madison's approach to personal branding and history of blogging (21:26)How Madison created her first tech opportunity - and why it was an unpaid apprenticeship (24:25)Why do companies want juniors with experience (26:44)How to get the experience needed for your first tech job (28:28)Why you should work on production code (29:28)Should you go easy on yourself or keep grinding? (31:50)Recently, Madison got laid off! But one tweet changed everything. A.K.A. Here's why you need to build community (37:04)Should you interview even when you're happy at your job? (44:38)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    Scrimba Podcast: From Doctor to Developer, with Jefferson TangScrimba Podcast: Becoming a Standout Developer with Randall KannaBook: Deep Work by Cal NewportBlog post: Why I'm Glad I Grew Up Playing Neopets

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Rían Errity 🇮🇪! He's a Scrimba student who started learning to code as a child. Today, he studies Computer Science and Language, a study program that marries his interest in linguistics with his passion for computing. He has also recently completed an internship with Microsoft!

    In this interview, Rían talks about his love for computers, growing up with Linux, how he ended up choosing his study program (hint: there was YouTube involved), and whether he actually needs a CS degree. Alex and Rían discuss what self-taught developers might be missing out on compared to developers who are learning to code at a university and what universities could learn from bootcamps and online platforms like Scrimba. You'll also hear all about Rían's internship at Microsoft and learn about his journey from Dublin, where he was competing with 16.000 candidates, to former Skype offices in Tallinn, Estonia!

    This episode is jam-packed with actionable advice, but it also brings you an exciting story brimming with enthusiasm!

    🔗 Connect with Rían

    👨‍💼 LinkedIn🌐 Website👨‍🚀 Github🤖 Rían#6500 at the Scrimba Discord

    ⏰Timestamps

    How Rían became a programmer: it started with growing up with Linux (02:00)What is CoderDojo (02:45)Why programming appealed to Rían as a child (04:01)On Lubuntu and Minecraft (05:42)How Rían chose his study program (by watching Tom Scott) (06:26)Computer Science and Language (08:37)Do universities give you more in-depth knowledge? (12:34)Teaching children how to code as another way of learning (14:17)Ad break: If you like the show - share it! And mention Alex on Twitter. Next week, it's Madison Kanna! We already interviewed her older sister (and the link for that episode is below, under Resources).What are self-taught developers missing out on compared to the ones coming out of a university? Do self-taught developers have a hidden advantage? (16:58)How do you test programming at a university? (20:11)Has math been important to Rían as a developer? (21:54)How Rían got an internship at Microsoft (23:42)Are Microsoft internships attainable to self-taught developers? (26:38)How Rían had to compete with 16.000 people and eventually ended up at the old Skype headquarters in Estonia (28:58)Does Microsoft care about technical skills or culture fit? (32:48)Rían's interview process for a Microsoft internship (35:24)What is the difference between coding and programming? (37:37)How Rían thought the offer from Microsoft was a spam email (38:40)More on Microsoft's interviews (39:49)What does being an intern at Microsoft look like? (41:17)Rían's advice to anybody who's just starting to learn how to code (45:18)Easy apply! (46:40)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    CoderDojoTom Scott and Computerphile on YouTubeScrimba Podcast: Becoming a Standout Developer with Randall KannaScrimba's Discord community

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Mike Chen 🇺🇸! Mike is a self-taught developer who worked at Yahoo, Google, and Airbnb, before becoming a CTO and co-founder of Motivo. Nowadays, he also helps other coders succeed. In this episode, you'll find out what it was like to work at Google and what are the pros and cons of working in a big tech company. You'll learn how to stand out as a new developer without a degree and why you should (not) idealize Silicon Valley.

    Ultimately, Mike will tell us why tech is cool (if you have a passion for it), as well as how we should go about putting in our work wisely and why it is worth it. He will also reveal what motivates him to teach and mentor other developers!

    ➡️ Do a mock interview with Mike Chen!

    🔗 Connect with Mike

    👨‍💼 Linkedin🐦 Twitter🌐 Website👨‍🚀 Github

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Mike went from studying biochemistry to becoming a developer and eventually worked at Google (02:55) Paul Irish: Tools, not rules (05:29)Has the way big tech companies hire changed since Mike broke into the industry? (06:22)How were the front-end roles at Google structured back then? (09:46)Ad break: How to support us + Next week: Rian Errity, who's doing a lot of cool stuff (12:25)How big is Google's infrastructure, actually? (14:05)Mike's experience at Google and the benefits of working at a big tech company (15:32)Why working in big tech ultimately didn't work for Mike (17:11)Why do hiring managers like people with big companies on their resumes (18:25)You have to figure out what you want out of a tech job (21:25)The best way to demystify Silicon Valley is to be in Silicon Valley (22:51)Career advice for new developers: How can they stand out if they don't have a degree and haven't worked at Google? (24:19)Why you should have a demonstrable track record (27:45)Losing your passion is normal over time; here's what to do first (28:44)What did Mike have to give up on to learn to code and change careers? (31:19)In tech, it pays off to put in more work, but not any kind of work (33:09)What motivates Mike to help other developers (37:18)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    Mock Junior Front End Web Developer Interview with Mike Chen and Silvia8 essential career tips for new web developersPaul Irish's blog

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Vikas Jyani 🇮🇳! He studied fine arts before discovering coding and realizing that web development is what can combine his eye for design and interest in tech.

    In this episode, you'll hear about Vikas's approach to learning and job hunting and why he thinks remote work might still not be optimal for a junior. He talks about life-changing advice he got from a senior developer when he saw Vikas was burning out, recognizing red flags in job offers, and, eventually, how he tripled his salary within a year from getting his first job!

    You will also learn more about India. Specifically, its job market and education, differences between big and small cities, and why a hybrid approach to work, combining remote work and going to an office, might not work there.

    🔗 Connect with Vikas

    👨🏽‍💼 Linkedin🌐 Portfolio🤖 Vick_Pro#6327 on the Scrimba Discord

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Vikas started coding after studying fine art and also discovered Scrimba (01:37)Job opportunities vs. the population in India (05:00)How Vikas got out of tutorial hell (07:33)How Vikas decided to get into React (09:04)Ad break: We did an episode with Bob Ziroll! Next week, an episode with Mike Chen! Also: how you can support us if you like what we're doing. (10:34)Vikas's approach to applying for jobs (13:21)How positive feedback from a hiring manager who couldn't hire him helped Vikas keep going (14:31)Vikas even turned down an offer because he recognized shady practices! (16:15)How Vikas got a job offer when he thought he failed a trial assignment (17:27)A senior developer recognized Vikas was burning out and gave him life-changing advice (20:40) As a junior, should you go for a remote or office job? (21:54)Would a hybrid approach to working work out in India? (26:16)How Vikas tripled his junior salary (27:18)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    The Frontend Developer Career PathScrimba's Discord CommunityScrimba Podcast with Bob Ziroll

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Hussien Khayoon 🇨🇦! Hussien is a Full-stack engineer with almost a decade of experience. Currently, he works as a Staff Software Engineer at Shopify. He is also a Bootcamp Mentor at Springboard, and, as you can guess, he's very passionate about helping new developers land on their feet. In this episode, Hussien will be your mentor.

    Hussien and Alex will help you feel confident and teach you a couple of things that can help you land your first coding job. They explain why is the interview process at big tech companies as complicated as it is and tell you what you do about it. Hussien shares his approach to both interviewing and being interviewed, as well as his take on bootcamps vs. universities. By the end of the show, you'll hopefully feel more inspired to learn to code, start applying for jobs, and navigate your new role - or at least figure out how to assess if you need to study more.

    🔗 Connect with Hussien

    👨🏽‍💼 Linkedin🐦 Twitter📹 Youtube

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Hussien started coding - it wasn't without struggle (01:29)What's the difference between solving a math problem and a coding problem? (04:31)The problem with the way coding is taught at universities (06:02)Is there any prestige in getting a degree? (08:20)Programming is vast: do you have to know everything? (12:40)Elitism and gatekeeping in the coding community (15:48) Is learning to code similar to learning a language? (17:38)Interview processes at big companies: why are they the way they are? (18:13)Does LeetCode make you a better developer? (22:36)Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and learning to code (23:09)Are big tech companies doing interviews right? (24:55)Coding is just half the job (25:59)What a mentoring session is about (30:00)Companies are changing the way they hire + Hussien's approach to being interviewed (33:37)What do coding students need (35:49)Why do companies hire people who aren't perfect yet? (39:09)Your career has three stages (42:03)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    Free report: 4 Tips to Get your FIRST Coding Job FasterHussien's course: Get Your First Coding JobScrimba Podcast: This Scrimba Student Battled Depression and Landed a Job at Amazon After 1000 LeetCode Challenges

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Khaidem Sandip Singha 🇺🇸! He's a Scrimba student from Assam, India, who recently got a job at Amazon! 🎉 Originally, he studied civil engineering before realizing he was more interested in coding. In this episode, you'll hear how he learned to code, battled depression, and reverse-engineered a path to a FANG company.

    You will also learn about his approach to problem-solving and the benefits of practicing on LeetCode - not many students we interviewed did that, but Khaidem completed one thousand challenges! He also shares some details about Amazon's interview process and his approach to keeping up motivation.

    🔗 Connect with Khaidem

    👨‍💼 Linkedin👩‍🚀 GitHub🌐 LeetCode profile

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Khaidem went from civil engineering to learning to code (01:41)Chasing coding certificates or mastering the basics - what is more important for landing your first developer job? (03:20)How Khaidem reverse-engineered the path to a FANG company (04:33)Should you do LeetCode (06:01)The importance of consistency and persistency (07:16)Why Khaidem focused on LeetCode (08:34)Try different frameworks, but then specialize (12:09)Khaidem's approach to problem-solving (13:57)How Khaidem started his job search while suffering from depression (17:47)Khaidem's first jobs and how he knew he was overqualified (21:41)How Khaidem discovered Scrimba around Javascriptmas 2020 (23:15)Why Khaidem benefited from the Scrimba community (24:15)How Khaidem applied for Amazon (25:15)Amazon's interview process (27:18)How Khaidem got an offer, and why it's important to keep up motivation (30:03)Why you shouldn't give up (31:42)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    Udacity Intro to Programming NanodegreeBob Ziroll's React coursesLeetCodeScrimba Podcast: A Teacher's Job Is Never Done: Get Your Hands on the Keyboard with Bob ZirollScrimba Podcast: Talent Alone Is Not Enough: How Theo Changed Careers at 49 Scrimba Discord community

    ⭐️ Leave a Review


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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Bob Ziroll 🇺🇸! Bob is Scrimba's Head of Education and one of the Internet's favorite React teachers. In a past life, Bob worked in marketing before enrolling into a bootcamp, where he eventually became a teacher and Director of Education. In this podcast, you'll learn about his coding story and teaching philosophy, but also about the early days of Scrimba!

    Bob and Alex discuss career change, Sunday scaries, and finding the right learning path for you. You'll find out how much work goes into creating a quality coding course, what's the difference between courses and YouTube videos, and why it's sometimes better to learn things more slowly. Bob also talks about how he pushed the limits of the Scrimba platform, how it perfectly lent itself to a successful approach to pedagogy, and shares a wealth of good advice for everybody currently learning to code.

    🔗 Connect with Bob

    👨🏼‍💼 Linkedin🐦 Twitter

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Bob went from coding, to advertising, to coding again (via V School)(01:56)Why Bob got interested in advertising, and ended up with Sunday scaries (04:43)How Bob realized he was interested in teaching and making a bootcamp better (07:12)Is there a selfish aspect to teaching? (09:13)What does it take to make a Scrimba course? And how is the approach different when compared to YouTube? (11:51)How Bob discovered Scrimba and ended up recording his first Scrimba course (13:19)Bob's first React course gained traction... How did he look at the stats? (16:27)React is always evolving and a teacher's job is never done: Bob made more courses and here's in what order to watch them (19:54)What happens if you release a course and something immediately changes? (21:10)Pushing the limits of Scrimba's platform and Bob's approach to pedagogy (23:02)The importance of practice when learning to code (and otherwise) (25:16)Do not cram! (26:53)There's no reason to drink from a firehose (29:19)Making a students' knowledge sharp, vs broad (32:32)Quick-fire questions: lofi beats, electric cars, how not to disappoint Cassidy Williams (34:55)Remix meetup (38:33)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    Bob's courses on ScrimbaLofi beats on SpotifyCentered appLearn and Understand Node JS by Antony AliceaScrimba Podcast - Quincy Larson: Why Learning To Code as an Adult Might Be Easier Than You ThinkScrimba Podcast - Ace the job interview with Cassidy WilliamsScrimba Podcast - Be a Librarian, Not an Encyclopedia of Code: How To Learn (and Teach) Better, With Guil HernandezScrimba Podcast - Intentional career building with Kent C. DoddsBob's Remix meetup lightning talk

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Chris McCoy 🇺🇸! He's a pastor who did odd jobs on the side. But he was always interested in coding! Somewhere between working retail and doing food delivery, he realized he needed something more stimulating. Nine months later, he landed not one but two job offers as a junior developer!

    Chris CRUSHED it on LinkedIn, even though he never liked social media: in this episode, he shares his approach to posting and being actively present on the platform. You can use it both to learn and to connect with people working in the industry, and that's exactly what Chris did. Spoiler alert: it doesn't have to be complicated.

    You'll also learn more about internships: Chris landed one, which turned out to be pretty cool! What do companies look for in an intern? Should you become one, and how? He also shares how he approached learning to code and found a balance between learning and work. Chris and Alex also discuss what you can learn from odd jobs.

    Sadly, you won't learn the recipe for Chick-fil-A. But it does make an appearance in this episode :)

    🔗 Connect with Chris

    👨🏼‍💼 Linkedin

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Chris decided to become a developer (01:51)Can you still learn something from odd jobs that have nothing to do with coding? (03:19)How Chris chose to learn to code and found support in his community (04:35)Balancing work, learning, and being a pastor: how Chris did it (06:28)How Chris discovered Scrimba (09:16)It's okay not to know everything about development (12:08)Why you need real-world examples when learning a new skill (12:57)Did Chris complete Scrimba's Career Path or get a job before he managed to? (14:14)When and how did Chris start applying for jobs? (16:31)How Chris created a LinkedIn profile and started crushing it (17:31)How to be genuinely present on LinkedIn and use the platform to connect (18:33)Chris's approach to writing LinkedIn posts (21:36)How adding Scrimba to his education connected Chris to a recruiter (21:51)Can an internship be... good? (24:41)What does a company expect from an intern, and what did Chris do about it (27:05)Working with other interns and the higher-ups (30:02)How Chris compared to the other interns in his group (32:38)How Chris's internship turned into a job (34:33)In the end, Chris had not one but two job offers! How did he pick one? (36:17)The hard work paid off (37:49)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    The Frontend Developer Career Path

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  • 🎙 About the episode


    Meet Quincy Larson 🇺🇸! Quincy is the founder of freeCodeCamp, a nonprofit company that makes coding accessible for all. He is a self-taught developer who learned to code when he was 31. Why did he learn to code? Because he wanted to make a school he was a director of more efficient. So... We have a career changer!

    So, how does a teacher teach himself to code? And how does he teach others? In this episode, Alex asks hard questions, and Quincy answers all of them, sharing valuable insights on how adults learn, how important are your intrinsic capabilities, and why learning a new skill after the age of 25 might be easier than you think. You will also learn about the hacker ethic, how you can overcome your limitations, and why software developers need to be humble.

    🔗 Connect with Quincy

    👨🏼‍💼 Linkedin🐦 Twitter

    ⏰ Timestamps

    How Quincy Larson started coding at the age of 31... as a school director (01:55)Why you should hang out with other developers (03:52)What is the hacker ethic? (04:51)Why do software developers need to be humble? (07:07)Quincy learning to code before freeCodeCamp. What was that like? (08:16)How does a teacher learn? (11:09)The key learning technique for people over 25 (11:56)The elusive nature of learning to code (15:41)How does an adult brain learn, and why might kinesthetic learning be the best way? (17:29)Can an old dog learn new tricks? (18:57)Learning with analogies and associations + why you shouldn't drink (21:47)Quincy is a master learner... But what if you're not? (24:49)Can anyone learn to code and become a successful developer? (27:35)Are aptitudes important? (28:24)Overcoming your limitations (32:16)How does Quincy feel about the success of freeCodeCamp? (34:44)

    🧰 Resources Mentioned

    freeCodeCampHackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution, book by Steven Levy

    ⭐️ Leave a Review


    If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5-star review here and tell us who you want to see on the next podcast.


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